Setagaya

Name: Setagaya

Kind: Town/City

Free Wifi: Yes

Location: 35°38’47.97″ N 139°39’12.72″ E

Stations: Setagaya Station, Tōkyū Setagaya Line

Worth it? Yep.

Our Rating: ⭑⭑⭑

Updated 9/17/2021

©2021 tenmintokyo.com

Setagaya is a small residential town in southwest Tokyo. There’s not a huge amount to do, but it’s still interesting. There are several large parks in the area. There are also interesting museums.

The city was founded in 1947 after World War 2. It was also part of the 1964 Olympics.

The Tama River runs east-west a few miles to the south of the town.

Things to Do

There’s not a huge amount to do in Setagaya, but if you’re in the area, it’s still worth a stop. For such a small town, you can easily have a full day here. You can stroll around the small town center, and stumble down some charming side streets.

The main attraction is Carrot Tower (Kyarotto Tawā in Japanese) – a tall mixed-use complex + shopping mall. The name was chosen by a children’s contest. In addition to offices + stores, it also houses the game company Game Freak, creators of the Pokémon series of games. In the basement of Carrot Tower is another train station – Sangen-Jaya Station.

Wakabayashi Park + Setagaya Park

The main attractions in the area are 2 large parks: Wakabayashi Park + Setagaya Park. There are numerous other smaller parks in the area as well.

Just a few miles east of the station is Setagaya Park. The huge park has a fountain, a walkway, and lots of greenery.

Gōtokuji Temple + Setagaya Castle

About a mile west of the town’s center is Gōtokuji Temple with a huge garden and a cat shrine. It’s worth a stop if you have time for a short walk.

Just south of the temple are the ruins of Setagaya Castle.

Komazawa Olympic Park

2 miles south of the town is Komazawa Olympic Park – which was part of the 1964 Summer Olympics. If you’re up for a few miles’ walk it’s worth a look. They also have a website.

Zenyōmitsu-ji

At the very south end of the town on the banks of the Tama River is another small temple with some historical artifacts called Zenyōmitsu-ji.

Tamagawadai Park

Just east of Zenyōmitsu-ji is another small riverbank park – Tamagawadai Park – well within walking distance.

Museums

There are 4 large museums in Setagaya: Setagaya Art Museum, Setagaya Literary Museum, and Seikadō Bunko Art Museum, and Hasegawa Machiko Art Museum. This site has links + info about all the museums in Setagaya.

About 2 miles to the southwest of the town center is Kinuta Park – another huge park + home of Setagaya Art Museum.

Oya Soichi Bunko Library

About 3 miles to the northwest around 35°39’53.44″ N 139°37’10.32″ E is the Oya Soichi Bunko Library – a small private museum containing a huge magazine + book collection of the late social critic Oya Soichi, who died in 1970.

Sakura-shimmachi + Kamimachi Station Stations

About a mile south of the town, there is also another train station: Sakura-shimmachi Station around 35°37’55.54″ N 139°38’41.80″ E. Around 35°38’36.07″ N 139°38’48.39″ E is Kamimachi Station.

Conclusion

Although Setagaya is a small town, there’s still enough to do to make it worth a quick stop. Be sure to check out the side streets, the parks, and museums.

Enjoy!

LINKS

Setagaya

Setagaya Station – Wikipedia

Tōkyū Setagaya Line

Tokyo/Setagaya – Wikitravel

Setagaya Area Guide | Tokyo Cheapo

Setagaya City: Tokyo’s most populous ward

Setagaya Park | The Official

Setagaya Park | Tokyo Cheapo

Setagaya Park, Great for Young Kids – Tokyo Expat Family Guide

Ota City Official Travel Guide

Carrot Tower – Wikipedia

東急株式会社オフィスビル :: キャロットタワー

世田谷公園 | 世田谷区ホームページ

Kinuta Park: A Little Gem for Nature Lovers in Setagaya | Tokyo Cheapo

Gōtokuji: Temple with most cats in Tokyo | Exploring Old Tokyo

Gotokuji Temple | Japan Reference

Gotokuji Temple – Atlas Obscura

Gotokuji Temple – Cats, Cats, Cats, Cats…

Setagaya Literary Museum – Wikipedia

https://www.setabun.or.jp/

Setagaya Arts Navigation

Seikadō Bunko Art Museum – Wikipedia

Tamagawadai Park – Ota City Official Travel Guide

https://www.tef.or.jp/kopgp/

Komazawa Olympic Park – Wikipedia

https://www.oya-bunko.or.jp/

Sōichi Ōya – Wikipedia

VIDS