Shimbashi Superguide

Name: Shimbashi

Kind: Town

Free Wifi: Yes

Location: 35°39’56.24″ N 139°45’28.49″ E

Station: Shimbashi Station (G-08), Tokyo Metro Ginza Line, JR Yamanote Line, JR Tōkaidō Main Line, JR Yokosuka Line, JR Keihin-Tōhoku Line, Toei Asakusa Line, Yurikamome (U-01)

Our Rating: ⭑⭑⭑⭑

Worth it? Yep.

Updated 3/30/2021

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

Shimbashi is a major Tokyo area just south of Ginza/Yurakucho in eastern Tokyo. It lies directly west of the world-famous Hamarikyu Gardens, a stone’s throw from Toranomon to the west, and southeast of the Imperial Palace. Just to the east of Shimbashi Station is the eastern termius for the new fully-automated Yurikamome Line which runs in a loop out to Odaiba and many of the other artificial islands in Tokyo Bay.

For the surrounding area, see our other guides on Toranomon, Shiodomé, and Ginza.

Outside Shimbashi Station on the west side facing south. There’s lots to do here. The tall buildings on the left are Shiodomé.

Inside Shimbashi Station near the Ginza Line entrance.

Shimbashi is known for being a quasi-Shitamachi (old city) Tokyo area, but there’s plenty of newer things to do and see in the area.

One of the coolest aspects of Shimbashi is the large number of great hidden restaurants on its backstreets.

Shimbashi Station is one of the oldest in Tokyo – having been built right around the time the new current Tokyo Station was built after the 1923 earthquake. But the Former Shimbashi Station (the original one) is still around and has been restored. It sits between Shimbashi and Shiodomé to the east near the Panasonic building.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Former Shimbashi Station. The Panasonic Building is on the right. If you happen to be in the Panasonic Bldg. also check out the very nice museum inside. The station’s original tracks have been long removed, but the frame for the railway’s overhead outdoor roof is still intact today – along with some of the original buildings, which are now over a century old.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Yurikamome 02 – Shiodome Station. Note the traditional-style pillars on the right.

Shiodomé area. Shimbashi is just to the northwest (left) behind the green Panasonic building in the distance. This photo is facing north. If you head left where the cement truck is, you’ll eventually come to Toranomon. Heading right leads to the waterfront and Hinodé (which is interesting in its own right).

©2019 tenminutetokyo.com

You’ll find all kinds of cool restaurants such as this one under the station.

Access

Any of the lines mentioned above will bring you to Shimbashi. But your best bet is probably the Metro Ginza Line. Also note the Ginza Line has a direct Ginza stop also. The Ginza Line is useful because both termini on either end are easily accessible to 2 other major areas of Tokyo – Shibuya to the west and Asakusa to the northeast.

Shimbashi Station is a large brick above-ground station with an east and west side. The east side is rather small but features some old locomotive parts + plaques. There’s not much to do on the east side as it’s just a block from Shiodomé. The interesting side is the west side which is adjacent to the main area. There’s also an old historical steam locomotive in the square on the west side. You can also walk from any of the areas mentioned fairly quickly.

At first the backstreets can be confusing, but you’ll soon get used to them.

New JR station renovations are being completed as of 2021.

The Sugi Drug Exit

Aside from the main station exits, there are several other street-level exits around the area. One of the major ones is the sidewalk exit right next to a corner drug store called Sugi Drug across the street from the northeast corner of the station around 35°40’03.52″ N 139°45’31.25″ E. This exit is handy because it’s on Rt. 405 which runs east-west into Toranomon to the west. If you head just up the street north of this corner you’ll also find one of the best Korean restaurants in Tokyo on the left.

The Metro street exit right next to Sugi Drug.

Hidden Bike Park

Just across the street from Sugi Drug to the southwest around 35°40’02.94″ N 139°45’30.31″ E is a hidden bicycle locker under the train tracks. You can park your bike here for 24 hours for around 400¥ ($4) which is a great deal. When you’re ready to retrieve your bike, use the automated pay machine at the west end of the lot:

©2019 tenminutetokyo.com
©2019 tenminutetokyo.com

As a footnote, if you head 1 block north of Sugi Drug (shown on the right here), you’ll be heading into Ginza if you keep going straight. If you take the crosswalk shown here, just on your left one block up is one of the best Korean restaurants in all of Tokyo: Bokuden around 35°40’06.74″ N 139°45’31.42″ E. The hidden bike park is just to the left, out of frame.

Coin Lockers

There are several cheap coin lockers around + in the station – one bank is just inside the west exit, one is deeper underground in the station near the Metro platforms, and one is outside on the southeast side under a covered walkway. All are fairly cheap + easy to use.

©2019 tenminutetokyo.com

A bank of lockers inside on the way to the JR and Metro platforms.

©2019 tenminutetokyo.com

The southwest side outdoor lockers. There is also an automated currency exchange machine straight ahead. You can pay for a locker using your Suica or other IC card at the black terminal shown on the right.

©2019 tenminutetokyo.com

The indoor platform map underground.

Area Layout

Shimbashi Station is center right, just west of Shiodomé. Hamarikyu Gardens is in the lower right corner, the south end of the Imperial Palace is in the upper left corner, and Toranomon is off to the left. If you go far enough north from Shimbashi Station, you will hit Ginza, and beyond that, to the north, Tokyo Station.

©2019 tenminutetokyo.com

The main area just outside the west exit. The retro bldg. on the left was built in the 1970’s.

LABi Shimbashi

Just across from the old locomotive outside the west exit of the station is a large Yamada Denki (Electronics) LABi. If you’re looking for a big electronics store in Shimbashi, this is it. It’s across the street from the station around 35°40’02.10″ N 139°45’26.04″ E.

©2019 tenminutetokyo.com

LABi Shimbashi, right. The station is just to the left out of view.

Backstreets

Shimbashi has some of the coolest backstreets in Tokyo. After dark there are endless things to do. Restaurant options are nearly unlimited. You can spend hours wandering around and not see it all. Plan on spending several hours exploring. Shimbashi isn’t a very large area of Tokyo but there is lots to do nonetheless.

©2019 tenminutetokyo.com

A very popular high-end shop just under the Shimbashi train tracks.

©2019 tenminutetokyo.com

©2019 tenminutetokyo.com

Man In The Moon Pub

Possibly the most popular bar in all of Shimbashi is the foreigner-friendly Man In The Moon pub located just northwest of the station around 35°39’55.25″ N 139°45’22.40″ E. Be sure to check it out.

©2019 tenminutetokyo.com

West Into Toranomon

If you head 2 blocks south from the station, then hang a right west, you’ll come to the very cool area called Toranomon – home to the upscale Toranomon Hills complex. Check out our 2-part series on Toranomon. If you’re looking for a good reasonable capsule hotel, check out First Cabin Atagoyama on the way, around 35°39’51.57″ N 139°45’07.50″ E. It’s tucked down a quiet little side street.

©2019 tenminutetokyo.com

First Cabin Atagoyama

Tamiya Playmodel Factory

Also along the way if you’re into hobbies, check out the Tamiya Playmodel Factory store just on the corner around 35°39’53.12″ N 139°45’17.64″ E. Very cool.

©2019 tenminutetokyo.com

Toarnomon Koffee

If you’re in the mood for a cool coffee experience, check out Toarnomon Koffee in the Toranomon Hills complex on the 2nd floor at 35°39’59.73″ N 139°44’59.86″ E. Definitely worth a look.

1-23-3 Toranomon, Minato-ku,Tokyo 2F Toranomon Hills Mori Tower 105-6302 Japan

〒105-6302 東京都港区虎ノ門1-23-3 虎ノ門ヒルズ 森タワー2階

©2019 tenminutetokyo.com

Toarnomon Koffee is just on the right on the 2nd floor of the Torranomon Hills complex. Note the top of Tokyo Tower in the distance.

WTC + Seaside Top Observatory

If you’re willing to walk a mile south to Tokyo’s World Trade Center, you can enjoy spectacular views of Tokyo from the top floor at the Seaside Top Observatory. The WTC is located around 35°39’22.82″ N 139°45’23.91″ E and is easy to get to. If you’re willing to change trains once, you can also get right to its front door at an Onarimon Station exit.

©2019 tenminutetokyo.com

One of the most famous views of Tokyo is this view from the Seaside Top Observatory. Toranomon is just to the right out of frame. The tall bldg. in the distance is the HQ of the Mori Construction Company.

Conclusion

Well that’s it for now. Spend some time getting around Shimbashi and you won’t be disappointed.

Enjoy!

Additional Photos

©2019 tenminutetokyo.com

Facing the station from the northeast around 3:30 PM – an early sunset in fall.

©2019 tenminutetokyo.com

Under the Shimbashi Station tracks built in 1938.

©2019 tenminutetokyo.com
©2019 tenminutetokyo.com

On the Ginza Line platform.

©2019 tenminutetokyo.com

Kasumigaseki– just north of Shimbashi in late fall.

Additional Photos

On a side street near the station.

At the station’s west entrance, right.

Abandoned west entrance at night during COVID-19.

Inside the station at night.

Newly-renovated east entrance.

LINKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shinbashi

https://www.tokyometro.jp/lang_en/station/shimbashi/index.html

https://www.tokyometro.jp/lang_en/station/line_ginza/index.html

Former Shimbashi Station

http://www.oldtokyo.com/shimbashi-station-kasumori-c-1910-1923/

Hamarikyu Gardens (浜離宮恩賜庭園|公園へ行こう)

Shiodomé Superguide

Toranomon Superguide Part 1

Ginza Superguide

Tokyo Station City

Yurikamomé

https://www.yurikamome.co.jp/en/

Panasonic Shiodome Museum of Art: Up Close and Personal

https://www.tamiya-plamodelfactory.co.jp/

http://www.japan-trip.jp/area/ginza/world-trade-center-building-seaside-top-observatory.html

VIDS

Shibuya Superguide

Name: Shibuya

Kind: Town

Free Wifi: Yes

Location: 35°39’33.62″ N 139°42’03.08″ E

Stations: Shibuya Station, Ginza Line, Hanzomon Line, Fukutoshin Line, Keio Shibuya Station

Worth it? Do not miss it.

Our Rating: ⭑⭑⭑⭑⭑

Updated 8/3/2021

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

Photos may take a while to load.

Shibuya is known as a fashion + nightlife area among the young in Tokyo. One of the most dazzling + vibrant areas in Tokyo, Shibuya is full of life. There are an endless variety of things to do here. The area is surprisingly compact and can easily be walked in a day or night, but not in only 1 day if you want to enjoy everything it has to offer.

Be sure to check out the offical redevelopment site Hello Neo-Shibuya.

Also be sure to check out the Shibuya City Official site.

Access

The main rail transit point is Shibuya Station – which intersects several major rail lines and 3 Tokyo Metro Subway Lines: The Ginza, Hanzomon, and Fukutoshin Lines. In fact, it’s the western terminus for the Ginza and Hanzomon lines, and the eastern terminus for the Fukutoshin line. The station is being vastly remodeled as part of Neo-Shibuya – a complete redevelopment of the entire area not expected to be completed until 2027. Redevelopment is well underway and several new large complexes are already complete, which we will discuss below.

You may also take the JR Yamanote Line to Shibuya Station and exit the gate to the west into Hachiko Square. There is also another line at the station called the Tōkyū Tōyoko Line which runs south to Yokohama.

Shibuya Station extends 3 floors below ground as well with a huge shopping mall and restuarants inside as well. There is also a large east-west passage underground known as Shibuya Chikamichi.

There are 1/2 a dozen exits from the station, but the most popular exit is the Hachiko Square exit on the west side as it leads directly to Shibuya Crossing.

There is also another station underground a few blocks to the west around 35°39’29.78″ N 139°41’56.37″ E called KEIO Shibuya Station on the Keio Inogashira Line. KEIO is a big depato (department store) chain in Japan and they often locate rail stations near their stores.

Shibuya is just south of Harajuku/Omotesando just to the north. In fact, you can walk there in just a few minutes from Harajuku Station by taking the street south from Yoyogi National Gymnasium next to Harajuku Station. The street brings you right into the central Shibuya Crossing – one of the most iconic and filmed city locations in Tokyo.

Oddly, the word Harajuku means “Original lodgings“, whereas Shinjuku just to the north means “New Lodgings“. The etymology of both words is unclear, but undoubtedly are related to the Edo Period when the capital of Japan was moved from Kyoto to Edo (present-day Tokyo).

Also see our other pages about most of the other stops on the Hanzomon Line.

Area Layout

Facing north. Shibuya Crossing is in the top center, Shibuya 109 just to the left of that up the street, and Shibuya Scramble Square and Hikarie Shibuya are the large skyscrapers off to the right. If you follow the central north street from the Crossing, you will arrive at the next town to the north – Harajuku. Shibuya Mark City is the tall complex on the center left which includes a very nice deluxe hotel. The hidden backstreets are just up the small street to the left next to the building in the upper center in this photo.

Another view of Shibuya Crossing – this time from the northwest facing southeast. The crossing is in the middle center. Shibuya Scramble Square and Hikarie Shibuya are the two large skyscrapers in the top center. (Hikarie or Hikari means “light” in Japanese). If you head left (east) down the main street, you will come to the more business-oriented side of Shibuya, which also has some nice restuarants + shops on the street level worth checking out.

4 Main Avenues

There are 4 main avenues around the center of Shibuya: 1) the east-west street with the business area on the east side and Shibuya 109 on the west side, 2) the north-south street running from the central Crossing up to Harajuku, 3) the area south of the station, and 4) the hidden north backstreets to the northwest of the square.

You can spend hours exploring each so it’s best to plan to spend an entire day + an entire night in the area if possible. If you really want to see everything in-depth, plan on 2 days.

Hachiko Square

Just to the west of the JR station exit is the world-famous Hachiko Square area. A small courtyard just outside the station, it’s a popular meeting spot for young people. The square is named after the dog Hachiko who famously waited for his late master every day at the station for 9 years. The square is the gateway to central Shibuya and Shibuya Crossing is just to the north of it.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Facing east at Shibuya Crossing. The JR Shibuya Station entrance is right next to Hachiko Square shown on the right. Shibuya Scramble Square and Hikarie Shibuya are the 2 large skyscrapers shown on the right.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Facing south at Shibuya Crossing. The JR Shibuya Station entrance is right next to Hachiko Square shown on the left. This entire section including the station is slated for a mega-renovation to be completed by 2027. The redevelopment will change the face of Shibuya forever.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Shibuya Crossing, facing north. Shibuya 109 is down the street to the left. Hachiko Square is behind the camera. The small sidestreet in the center of the photo leads to an endless array of backstreets as well as to the Sakura Currency Exchange (explained below). Heading north from the TSUTAYA on the right leads to Harajuku. Described later are backstreets, some of which are reachable by following the small entrance under the Forever 21 sign straight ahead.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Another view of Shibuya Crossing facing south. Hachiko Square is straight ahead. Shibuya Scramble Square is the tall skyscraper on the left. As of 2021 the white Tokyu bldg. ahead is slated to be torn down for Shibuya’s redevelopment.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Southwest corner at the Crossing. The street to the right (west) is full of interesting shops, cafés, and restaurants. Shibuya 109 is also to the right. Down at the end of this street is the very nice + afforable APA Hotel Shibuya. The tall bldg. in the back is the Shibuya Mark City Hotel. The bldg. shown here is a “food tower” or food palace – a throwback to 1950’s-style dining. These buildings are all over Tokyo and offer all sorts of different culinary experiences. The L’Occitane Café on the first 3 floors is an upscale experience.

Shibuya Scramble Square + Hikarie Shibuya

Around 35°39’27.42″ N 139°42’09.26″ E there are 2 huge new skyscraper developments in Shibuya: Shibuya Scramble Square (SSS) + Hikarie Shibuya. Hikarie Shibuya is on the east, which opened in 2012 and which has a big office tower, a shopping mall, a mezzanine level, a museum, and lots of restaurants. In its basement are routes into the new Shibuya Station including the Ginza Metro line. There are some vids we shot below looking down on Shibuya from the Mezzanine Level. This place is a must-see even if it’s just to walk around.

Also as part of the Neo-Shibuya development, just across the street to the west is the brand new Shibuya Scramble Square complex which opened in Nov. 2019. It also has a mall, restaurants, offices, and lots of shops + passages into the subways. But its most interesting + dazzling feature is a rooftop observatory described next. There is also a floor guide on their website.

Shibuya Sky

On the top of SSS is a huge open-air rooftop observatory, Shibuya Sky. It’s not to be missed for anything. Only a glass wall separates you and a 360-degree view of all of Tokyo. A spectacular must-see. Adult tickets are a little spendy @ around $18/person, but it’s well worth it for an experience you’ll never forget.

To get to either development, head a block east from Hachiko Square, then south 1 block. You can also get to the buildings from inside the station.
You can find out more about the area and the redevelopment plan over on the excellent https://www.shibuyastation.com/shibuya-station-area-redevelopment-plan/ site.

Shibuya Sky

Entrance to Shibuya Sky.

Shibuya STREAM

On the back (south) side of SSS is a cool little multiuse area called Shibuya STREAM. The area has lots of food + shopping + is a nice place to stroll.

You can also get to it from street level across from Shibuya Hikarie, or from the elevated walkway at the intersection just south. If you go to SSS, be sure to check out Shibuya STREAM.

Shibuya STREAM on the backside of SSS.

Shibuya STREAM is quite extensive and has lots of food choices. There’s a Dean + Deluca on the 2nd floor.

Shibuya Mark City

Shibuya Mark City is a large mall + hotel just to the west of Shibuya Station. There are loads of great restaurants + cafés inside. It’s just across the street from Hachiko Square so be sure to check it out. There are also a bunch of interesting side streets around the complex worth exploring as well.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Shibuya Mark City is just across the street to the west from Hachiko Square.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Entrance to Shibuya Mark City.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Looking back east towards the Shibuya Mark City Hotel from a few blocks away.

Shibuya 109

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Just up the street to the west of Hachiko Square is a complex called Shibuya 109. It’s mostly just shops + restaurants, but it’s worth a look. At the corner of Shibuya 109 the street splits in two – you can head north (right) into some more shopping, the MEGA Don Quijote (see below), and eventually pass the Hotel koé Tokyo – which is a little spendy, but very nice if you plan to stay in the area.

Alternatively you can head up the street on the left (west) side of the corner, which in our opinion is more interesting. At the end of this street is APA Hotel Shibuya which is a really good value. There are also a lot of really good cafés including Café Legato on this street. The area is tree-lined and makes for a very enjoyable walk up and back. Definitely a must-see.

Bic Camera

No trip to Japan would be complete without an electronics store stop and Shibuya doesn’t disappoint. Just to the west of the L’Occitane Café mentioned above is Shibuya’s large Bic Camera – one of the biggest electronics shops in Tokyo. There is also a smaller Bic Camera Annex 2 blocks to the east around 35°39’35.03″ N 139°42’07.47″ E (on the corner just before the turn north to Shibuya Miyashita Park mentioned below).

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

The main Bic Camera facing east.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Bic Camera Annex is just out of frame to the right 2 blocks to the east of the Crossing. This photo is facing back west towards the Crossing. The tall tower in the distance is Shibuya Mark City Hotel. Shibuya Station is ahead on the left. There’s a video of this scene at the end of the page.

Giant Tokyu

If you head a few blocks north of Shibuya 109 up the street to the right side, you’ll come to another huge Tokyu Depato (department store) around 35°39’39.30″ N 139°41’48.70″ E. Shibuya 109 is actually owned by Tokyu also. The name “109” is actually a Japanese play on words because To-kyu sounds a bit like the Japanese numbers for ten and nine. There is also a huge H+M mall on the right just before it. There are all kinds of fascinating tiny backstreets and alleys around the area. You can spend hours exploring.

Internet Cafés + Shibuya Maruyamacho

Along this route you’ll also pass the INET internet café + Karaoké lounge. If you’re looking for a really dirt cheap place to stay in Shibuya, INET might work, but be prepared for cigarette smoke, noise, and lots of other people – the place offers a small cubicle with a bed, chair, tiny desk, and PC for around $24/night. But if you’re in need of a really cheap place, or need a quick place to crash, INET might work. Shibuya has many such internet cafés – search the web for the best picks.

Also, just to the north (left) of INET there’s a very interesting side street called Shibuya Maruyamacho worth checking out (see vid below).

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Also on this street a little further west is the very nice Café Legato hidden away on the 3rd floor of this bldg. on the left:

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Also in the vicinity is this very large 2-story Excelsior Café.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Looking back east towards the Crossing from the steps of Shibuya 109. There is plenty to see + do on this street too. Just up the street behind the camera is Shibuya’s MEGA Don Quijote discount store. There is another small food palace and Big Echo Karaoké place in the building on the left.

MEGA Don Quijote just north of Shibuya 109.

Also further north on this street you’ll pass a great bike shop called Y’s Road (there are many of them in Tokyo). They mostly sell higher-end performance bikes, but you can sometimes find bargains.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Shibuya Miyashita Park

1 block to the northeast of the Crossing is the newly-opened Shibuya Miyashita Park. It’s a very nice multi-level food, shopping, and entertainment complex. The roof has a volleyball court + other stuff to do. Definitely check it out. To get there head east from the Crossing for 2 blocks, then turn left (north) and it will be on your left.

See our full post on SMP here.

Backstreets

There are endless backstreets to explore in Shibuya. The most interesting are behind the Q-Front bldg. with the TSUTAYA in it shown above center-right. Head up the small street just to the left of the bldg., then head north, west, or down any other side street. There is an entire web of interesting streets in this are as shown below:

©2019 tenmintokyo.com
©2019 tenmintokyo.com
©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Winter Illuminations

In Dec-Jan, Shibuya has dozens of spectacular winter illuminations all over the city. The most impressive one is just north of Shibuya Crossing in a small park just to the south of Yoyogi National Gymnasium. If you’re there in the winter, check them out – it’s well worth it.

Shibuya Cultural Center + Planetarium

A few blocks to the south of the Crossing around 35°39’19.44″ N 139°41’59.49″ E is the Shibuya Cultural Center + Planetarium – which has a number of traditional arts plus a very nice large planetarium. Definitely worth checking out.

Hotels

There are lots of great hotels in Shibuya, some of them quite reasonable. It’s best to go during off-peak season for the best rates – try to avoid spring as that is when the demand is highest. We recommend checking out agoda.com for hotel/travel searches.

If you’re looking for an upscale hotel, there is the Shibuya Mark City mentioned above, and around 35°39’22.11″ N 139°41’58.31″ E there is the huge Cerulean Tower Tokyu Hotel which runs around $200/night. The APA Hotel Shibuya mentioned above is a much more affordable and is also very nice. There is also the very nice sequence MIYASHITA PARK for around $100/night.

If you’re willing to head about 1/2 mile south of the Crossing, there is also the very popular MUSTARD HOTEL which has slightly more reasonable rates.

Food

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Food options in Shibuya are endless. Restuarants, noodle shops, cafés, and specialty shops are everywhere. There is something to fit every taste and budget. From deluxe restaurants on the upper floors of hotels and skycrapers to hole-in-the-wall noodle shops there is something for everyone.

Shibuya Mark City has a huge restaurant court on its upper floors. To get there, head into the east side entrance to the west of Hachiko Square, then take the escalator up. There are dozens of restaurants everywhere. Shibuya 109 and Shibuya Scramble Square + Hikarie Shibuya also have lots of great restaurants. See their websites for floor guides with detailed lists of places to eat.

GEMS Food Tower

Just north of Shibuya Miyashita Park on the east side of the street around 35°39’48.87″ N 139°42’11.39″ E there is a huge food palace called GEMS Jingumae Food Tower. It has 8-9 floors of all kinds of stuff. Definitely check it out. Don’t forget that Shibuya Miyashita Park itself also has lots of great restaurants.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com
©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Shibuyacast

Also just around the same area at 35°39’46.02″ N 139°42’09.03″ E is a small courtyard called Shibuyacast. This place often holds outdoor gatherings at night with lots of outdoor food stalls and vendors. There are also shops and a small microbrewery called Brewdog. Worth a look:

©2019 tenmintokyo.com
©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Tower Records Café

Around 35°39’42.97″ N 139°42’03.22″ E there is a Tower Reccords store (a CD chain that went out of business in the US long ago), and it has a surprisingly good café on the upper floors.

Legato Café

The Café Legato mentioned above is also quite good and has a a full restaurant.

If you venture into the east side of Shibuya, there are several major streets lined with great places to eat.

Sarutahiko Cohee

“Cohee” is the Japanese word for coffee. If you head up the east side street north like you’re going to Harajuku, you’ll come to a big MODI shopping complex. Inside is a great café called Sarutahiko Cohee. If you’re a coffee lover, it’s a must-see.

MOS Burger Shibuya

If you’re in the mood for a quick fast food burger, check out MOS Burger Shibuya around 35°39’32.45″ N 139°41’52.03″ E. It’s just west of the UNIQLO store on the street heading up west from Shibuya 109:

©2019 tenmintokyo.com
©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Toki Seven Tea

On the way to Sakura Currency Exchange (shown below) be sure to stop and check out the “boba tea” shop Toki Seven Tea:

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

DEN Shibuya

Around 35°40’23.71″ N 139°42’45.76″ E is a really nice restaurant called DEN Shibuya. Check it out – it’s really nice.

Sakura – The Hidden Currency Exchange

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Watch for this elevator on the street on the left.

If you head north through the Crossing and go up the backstreet just to the left of the TSUTAYA record shop, in a few blocks around 35°39’36.75″ N 139°41’56.48″ E you’ll come to a tiny elevator right on the street which leads to the Sakura Currency Exchange on the 4th floor. Rates at this exchange are much better than at airports or banks in Japan. You’ll need to show your passport and they will scan it in order to make the transaction. Fees here are low so it’s worth a stop if you need to exchange money.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

On the way north to Sakura Exchange, which is just on the left after the Wendy’s.

Shibuya E-Space Tower

If you continue up the street to the west from the Crossing, around 35°39’26.58″ N 139°41’44.64″ E you’ll come to a building called Shibuya E-Space Tower. This building has some nice restaurants on the top floors, but it also has a nice glass elevator which faces the street. You can get spectacular views of Shibuya from the elevator on the way to the top. It also happens to have one of the coolest Kobans (police boxes) in all of Tokyo:

©2019 tenmintokyo.com
©2019 tenmintokyo.com

View from the E-Space Tower elevator.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Also nearby is the one-of-a-kind World Liquor System. Who says the Japanese don’t have a sense of humor?

Meguro Sky Garden

If you’re up for walking about a mile southwest of Shibuya, there is the spectacular Meguro Sky Garden – a huge lush garden built on top of a round freeway interchange. You can sit in the garden and relax + watch the clouds go by or enjoy the immaculately groomed landscape. There is also a subway station nearby so check the routes + maps. It’s well worth a quick visit if you have the time.

Conclusion

Well, that’s it. Shibuya is a vibrant + exciting area of Tokyo and you don’t want to miss it. You can easily spend a few days here so if you want to see it in-depth, stay at one of the good reasonable hotels in the area and spend a couple of days here. It’s worth the time.

Enjoy!

Additional Photos

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

On the JR Yamanote platform at Shibuya Station.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Inside a JR Yamanote Line car.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

This walkway to the south of Shibuya Mark City leads towards the west of Shibuya Crossing and to Shibuya 109. Just on the left is an excellent hamburger joint.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Inside Shibuya Mark City.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

The entrance to Hakkendana next to INET.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Shibuya’s hidden side streets offer adventure at every turn.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com
©2019 tenmintokyo.com
©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Heading north on the north-south street which leads to Harajuku. A must-see walk. There are also loads of good cafés inside the MODI building.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

MEGA Don Quijote up to the north past Shibuya 109.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

You can actually eat quite cheap+ healthy in Tokyo by utilizing Don Quijote specials such as these. Great meals for a few dollars. In this case only about $2 USD. The grocery areas are usually hidden away in the basements of most Don Quijotes.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Don Quijotes also have surprisingly good produce.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

One of many backstreets just northwest of the Crossing. You can spend hours and even days exploring.

Entrance to Shibuya STREAM.

Another view of Hikarie Shibuya, facing east. The walkway heads west into Shibuya Scramble Square across the street. The station is to the left, although you can also get to it from inside in the basement.

The vastness that is Tokyo.

More photos from Shibuya Sky:

View looking north into Shinjuku from Shibuya Sky.

NEO-Shibuya Station under construction east of the old station.

NEO-Shibuya Station.

Another platform in Shibuya Station under renovation in 2020.

A foreigner-friendly pub hidden away on the backstreets.

LINKS

Shibuya City Official

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shibuya

Metro Ginza Line

Metro Hanzomon Line

Tokyo Metro Hanzōmon Line – Wikipedia

Shibuya Station – Wikipedia

Hanzomon Line Posts

Keio Shibuya Station

https://helloneoshibuya.jp/swi/

Fukutoshin Line

Shibuya Station – Shibuya Transportation Guide

Shibuya Area Overview

Sightseeing in Shibuya – Walking the Big Two Part 1

https://helloneoshibuya.jp/

https://helloneoshibuya.jp/swi/

Tokyo City Guide: Shibuya

THE 15 BEST Things to Do in Shibuya – Tripadvisor

Shibuya Crossing

SHIBUYA SCRAMBLE SQUARE

Shibuya Sky

Shibuya Hikarie

Shibuya Mark City

Shibuya 109

MIYASHITA PARK 公式ウェブサイト

Shibuya Cultural Center

Sarutahiko Cohee

Hachiko

HELLO neo SHIBUYA | b’s mono-log

shibuya | Flickr

Mega Don Quijote, Shibuya – Japan’s Largest Discount Goods Store

Big Echo

hotel koé, Shibuya

Meguro Sky Garden

Shibuya-kei

VIDS

Shibuya Scramble Crossing Live Camera shows a cool 24/7 view of the Crossing.

Ground-level view of the Crossing facing north. Take the street ahead to get to Harajuku.

Hachiko Square is just across the street to the east.

There are 2 Bic Cameras in Shibuya – one just to the west of the Crossing, and the one shown here 1 block to the east on the northwest corner.

A birdseye view of Neo-Shibuya from Hikarie Shibuya to the east. This vid also shows the major redevelopment area south of the station as well as the Crossing at night.

View from the east side of Shibuya looking back towards the Crossing. There’s plenty to see + do on this street as well. Be prepared to walk for hours.

Down an east-side street. Wait for the roar of the train as it rushes by in a flash.

A few blocks up the street to the west of the Crossing. There are all kinds of great restaurants + cafés on this street. APA Hotel Shibuya is just at the end of the street to the west (behind the camera).

Sun Road is another hotel in Shibuya.

Inside the busy Starbucks just at the north end of the Crossing. On the 1st floor is a very nice TATSUYA record shop. The view from the window here of the Crossing is spectacular.

This vid starts 1 block west of the Crossing. The Bic Camera ANNEX is straight ahead in this thumbnail. Turn right here for Shibuya Miyashita Park.

Check out this very cool History of Shibuya Station.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v5VOTx1YfAg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jMk-Le01o_w&feature=emb_logo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wOTCGZd3qEo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FoWm9fAaEl4

88 things to do in Tokyo – 12th ed. guide map out now

In our humble opinion, Time Out Tokyo is one of the best, if not the best source of online info on things to do in Tokyo. Definitely check them out.

https://www.timeout.com/tokyo/things-to-do/88-things-to-do-in-tokyo-12th-edition-guide-map-out-now

Also check out some of their other great recent articles:

Where to see iconic Japanese scenery without leaving Greater Tokyo

7 best things to do in spring in Tokyo

Best day trips from Tokyo

Best nature escapes

Roppongi Art Night has gone online

Travelling under Covid-19: Getting from Narita and Haneda airports into Tokyo

5 places in Japan that look like scenes from Spirited Away

Time Out Tokyo magazine – digital edition

Ginza Superguide

Name: Ginza

Kind: Town

Free Wifi: Yes

Location: 35°40’19.54″ N 139°45’50.72″ E

Station: Yurakucho Station, JR Yamanote Line, Yurakucho Station/ | Tokyo Metro Line, Ginza Station – Ginza Line, Marunouchi Line, Hibiya Line

Worth it? A must-see.

Our Rating: ⭑⭑⭑⭑⭑

Updated 8/4/2021

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

The name “Ginza” is synonymous the world over with luxury + wealth. The name itself means “Silver Mint” – because when the Tokugawa Shogunate moved Japan’s capital from Kyoto to Edo (now Tokyo) in the early 1600’s, the largest silver mint in Japan was relocated to Ginza as well. (The name Tokyo actually means “Eastern Capital“).

Ginza is an astonishing place – not just for its luxury stores, and upscale vibe, but there’s a feel to the place all its own – let’s just call it an air of positivity. It’s also centrally located on the east side of Tokyo which makes it a good jumping off point to other parts of the city. To the north is Tokyo Station and the Marunouchi area – the central finance district of Tokyo, to the west is the Imperial Palace and Hibiya, and to south is Shimbashi.

One can wander the backstreets of Ginza, especially at night, and be dazzled at every turn.

There is also a large-scale diorama of late 19th century Ginza at the Edo-Tokyo Museum.

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

A typical store in Ginza.

Access

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

Be sure to first read our Yurakucho Superguide as it contains all the info you need on the main station near GinzaYurakucho, and the surrounding area to the west of Ginza. There are also smaller underground stations on the Ginza Line, Marunouchi Line, Hibiya Lines around Ginza at street level – but there is no central above-ground Ginza Station, surprisingly.

Tokyo Station is just to the north of Yurakucho and Ginza and is an easy walk in just a few minutes. Hibiya and the Imperial Palace are just to the west of the TIF and are also an easy walk. If you start early enough, you can see all 3 areas in one day – although that would be a very full day. Ginza alone can easily take 12-14 hours to fully explore and possibly a few days if you really want to see everything in-depth.

For ease of access, other than Yurakucho Station, the Ginza Metro Station is probably the best bet for most people – it also stops at many other interesting areas on the Ginza Line including Asakusa (its eastern terminus), Ueno, Kanda, Shimbashi, Toranomon, Akasaka-mitsuke, Omotesando, and Shibuya (its western terminus). It pops up onto the street in central Ginza with several different exits with the main one being around 35°40’19.54″ N 139°45’50.72″ E.

A few blocks east of the center of Ginza Crossing is Higashi-Ginza Station on the Hibiya Line (Higashi is the Japanese word for east, nishi means west).

Area Layout

Ginza lies to the southeast of Yurakucho in a roughly 5-block area. The 2 towns are right next to each other. Most of Ginza is laid out in a grid with a major central street running in both the north-south, and east-west directions. Just to the northwest of Yurakucho is the Tokyo International Forum – the elongated bldg. shown in the upper left of the photo above. Yurakucho Station is just south of that, and Ginza is the area in the lower center area of the frame. The Hibiya area is in the upper left corner.

First, Yurakucho + Hibiya

First, the Yurakucho area itself is worth a look. Adjacent to the Hibiya area, both can easily take a day to explore. Both are worth it. The north end of Yurakucho is the gateway to central Tokyo from the south – it’s well worth it to explore this area. See our Yurakucho Superguide for a comple guide to the area.

Tokyo International Forum to the North

Also a must-see is the Tokyo International Forum just to the north of Yurakucho. The TIF has a courtyard to the west with lots of cafés, restaurants, and shops. The buildings to the west are office + hotels. Definitely check the area out. North of that is Tokyo Station. The Forum also hosts the Oedo Antique Market on the 1st + 3rd weekend of every month right in the courtyard.

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

Yurakucho facing east. Ginza is straight ahead, Yurakucho Station directly behind the camera. The tall square bldg. ahead is MARRIONER GATE – a large shopping complex. Tokyo Kotsu Kaikan is a small shopping center built in the 1970’s. OIOI (pronounced Marui) is a large depato (department store) on the right.

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

Facing east crossing from Yurakucho into Ginza at MARRIONER GATE. Yurakucho is behind the camera.

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

Ginza | Nz is between Yurakucho and MARRIONER GATE in Ginza. This photo is facing south at the MARRIONER GATE crossing. MARRIONER GATE is to the east (left).

Hibiya just to the southwest.

There is also Metro Hibiya Station nearby in Hibiya, shown on the left here.

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

Inside the Ginza Metro Station.

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

On the Metro Ginza Line.

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

West side of Yurakucho Station facing east. Pass through the tunnel at the bottom of the frame to get to the east side. Ginza is just on the other side of the tall building.

Ginza

To get to Ginza from Yurakucho cross Sotobori-Dori from any of the side streets to the east. You may want to start at either the north or south end, and criss-cross the Ginza streets in a pattern since they are laid out in a grid. The main center of GinzaGinza Crossing and its world-famous Wako Building is down about 3 blocks east at 35°40’17.12″ N 139°45’53.76″ E. If you cross at the south end of Yurakucho near the new Tokyu Plaza around 35°40’20.09″ N 139°45’49.73″ E, you will be at the Wako Bldg. in 3 blocks. A famous corner Nikon (pronounced nee-kon, not nigh-kon) camera store and the Hermes building are on this corner as you cross. 2 blocks to the east is the SEIKO Watch Museum on the left.

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

The famous Wako Bldg. facing north. Yurakucho and Tokyu Plaza are off to the left out of view. So is the SEIKO Watch Museum. Sony Showcase is on the right out of view. If you turn right here and go to the Mitsukoshi building’s roof there is an open-air garden, shops, and several cafés. Matsuya Ginza, which has one of the best food basements in Tokyo is straight ahead on the right. The Ginza Apple Store is down on the left.

Mitsukoshi building.

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

Mitsukoshi‘s rooftop garden. Check it out. World-famous jeweler Mikimoto is across the street.

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

Matsuya Ginza Depachika (food basement). Don’t miss it. (“Depachika” is a Japanese contraction for “Department Store Basement”).

Apple Ginza.

Tokyu Plaza

Tokyu Plaza is well worth a stop in and of itself – it has a lot of great restuarants on the top floor + a very nice open-air rooftop garden. There is also a huge indoor café on one of the upper floors with floor-to-ceiling windows which provide a spectacular view of Ginza at night. It’s just to the south of the Yurakucho area.

Across from Tokyu Plaza Ginza at night.

Inside Tokyu Plaza there is a café with soaring ceilings and this awesome view.

Tokyu Plaza Ginza entrance at night.

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

The Hermes Building across from Tokyu Plaza Ginza.

Milky 70 Ice cream shop around 35°40’21.43″ N 139°45’48.96″ E.

Ginza Six

About 3 blocks southeast of Matsuya Ginza around 35°40’10.59″ N 139°45’53.82″ E is the spectacular new Ginza Six complex. A multi-use mall with shops, restaurants, and other attractions, Ginza Six is worth a stop. It also features a very nice open-air terrace shown below:

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com
©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

Namiki-Dori is one of many avenues running east-west in Ginza. Yurakucho is just a few blocks to the right. There is also a Metro Ginza subway portal on the corner.

Tokyo Square Garden

Just 1 block east of the Yurakucho crossing around 35°40’34.43″ N 139°46’09.47″ E is a bright new complex called Tokyo Square Garden. If you’re in Ginza it’s a must-see. Loaded with new shops, malls, restuarants, and offices, it’s one of Ginza’s up and coming addresses. There is also a WeWork co-working space inside. Check it out.

Food

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

Food options are endless in Ginza, and much of the fare is ultra-luxury high end restuarants + confectionary stores. There are also wineries, delicacy shops, and even upscale ramen places. Great Sushi places abound. You may want to do some web research before you go to determine which places you want to eat at since there are so many it’s impossible to catalog them all here. There are plenty of good places in Yurakucho as well including the Miami Café, OIOI and LUMINE food floors, and the Matsuya Ginza food basement, which is one of the best in Tokyo. Many of the large depato have great food on their upper floors, which is a common trend in modern Tokyo.

If you explore the backstreets you will find plenty of smaller ramen and other food shops – authentic local Japanese cuisine. This area is called Yurakucho Concourse and is directly under the train tracks to the east side of the station.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Yurakucho Concourse.

Ginza Sky Lounge

On top of Tokyo Kotsu Kaikan is the Ginza Sky Lounge restaurant – a laid back understated restaurant with a great view overlooking Ginza.

Kit-Kat Chocolatory

2 blocks east of Yurakucho around 35°40’20.59″ N 139°46’03.08″ E is the deluxe Kit-Kat Chocolatory. For some reason Kit-Kat is deemed a western luxury delicacy all over Japan – not the commodity candy bar it is considered in US supermarkets. There are endless flavors + styles of Kit-Kat in Japan, unlike in the west. If you like chocolate, this shop is a must-see in Ginza. There is also a new monster Kit-Kat store over in Shinjuku across the city. You can buy some of the Japan-themed Kit-Kats online over at yummy bazaar.

Le Chocolate De H Ginza

Also be sure to check out Le Chocolate De H Ginza.

Last But Not Least – Don Quijote Ginza

Just on the border of Ginza on the west side and Shiodomé on the east, there is this little Don Quijote 100¥ shop (known to locals simply as Donki). Like most Don Quijotes in Tokyo, they have a wide variety of goods packed into tiny aisles. They also have cheap snacks + cheap coffee. You can get a non-perishable 1 liter bottle of UCC Coffee for $.88 cents. Oddly, this Don Quijote has a wide variety of cheap but good bicycles for sale out front. They even have one made by GM’s Hummer brand. Definitely worth a stop.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com
©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Cheap culinary snack delights await you @ Don Quijote Ginza.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com
©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Kabukiza Theatre

Around 35°40’09.81″ N 139°46’03.64″ E, about a block or 2 east of Ginza Crossing is the Kabukiza Theater – one of Japan’s largest, and oldest Kabuki theaters. Kabuki is an ancient form of morality play and has survived to the modern day. The theater was destroyed by World War 2 Allied bombing but was rebuilt. There is also a tiny Japanese garden on the theater’s rooftop. Well worth a stop to check out some of traditional Japan. Shows are expensive – expect to pay a few hundred dollars. If you want quick, direct access to the theater by subway, take the Metro Hibiya Line to Higash-Ginza Station and exit to the street.

https://www.kabukiweb.net/theatres/kabukiza/

Conclusion

Well that’s it for now. There are endless things to do in Ginza and you can easily spend a few days here. It’s an absolute must-see if you’re in Tokyo.

Enjoy!

Additional Photos

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

Facing south on Sotobori-Dori – crossing into Ginza on the left from Yurakucho on the right. Tokyu Plaza Ginza is the tall black building in the distance. The shopping complex on the right is called Ginza | Nz.

Under Yurakucho Station.

Facing north on Sotobori Dori. Turning right here leads into Ginza. Yurakucho is on the left.

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

Another view of Hermes across from Tokyu Plaza Ginza.

Ginza Sony Park + Design Museum Box

Near the Hermes Bldg. shown above is the interesting Ginza Sony Park. There’s a cool little underground museum called Design Museum Box down a staircase at street level right next to the Hermes Bldg. Worth a quick look. There’s also a newly opened PlayStation museum in the basement.

Head down this starwell for the Design Museum Box.

Courtesy Totally Drew

Matsuya Ginza Depato

Just down the street from the Wako Bldg. is the great Matsuya Ginza department store (depato in Japanese). The food basement (Depachika) is really awesome and has lots of nice gifts + stuff to eat.

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

Entrance to Matsuya Ginza.

Another view of the Tokyu Plaza entrance.

At the Wako Bldg (right) facing south.

On a Ginza street at dusk. The Oslo Coffee shop is just on the left.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com
©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Endless adventures await you on the backstreets of Ginza.

©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Another view of Matsuya Ginza.

LINKS

Yurakucho Station/ | Tokyo Metro Line

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yamanote_Line

Yūrakuchō Station – Wikipedia

Yurakucho Station | JapanVisitor Japan Travel Guide

Yurakucho Station, Chiyoda, Japan Tourist Information

Ginza Station

Higashi Ginza Station, Hibiya Line

GINZA OFFICIAL

Yurakucho : Best Things to Do in 2021

Yurakucho Superguide

SEIKO Museum Ginza

https://www.ginzasonypark.jp/e/

Shinkansen @ Yūrakuchō Station near Ginza

Hibiya – Tokyo’s Elegant Walk

Tokyo International Forum

Tokyo International Forum – Wikipedia

Wako Building

Matsuya Ginza

https://ginza6.tokyo/

Tokyu Plaza Ginza has a rooftop co-working space – and it’s free

Ginza Japanese Cuisine on the App Store

Kit-Kat Chocolatory

A Must-Visit Hidden Gem in Ginza: The Showa Retro Café Ginza

Cafe Paulista in Ginza: Japan’s oldest existing kissaten is model for coffee shops across the country

https://www.amazon.com/s?k=kit+kat+chocolatory&hvadid=78683806185431&hvbmt=bb&hvdev=c&hvqmt=p&tag=mh0b-20&ref=pd_sl_8impajdfw8_b

kabuki-za.co.jp

VIDS

Yurakucho Station is one of the best Shinkansen-spotting places in Tokyo. Ginza is directly behind the camera to the east.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sbg_HgQKxd0

This video shows other views of the area around Yurakucho Station. Bic Camera and Tokyo International Forum are shown behind the tracks in this thumbnail.

Jimbocho: Tokyo’s “Book Town”

Name: Jimbocho

Kind: Town

Free Wifi: Yes

Location: 35°41’45.95″ N 139°45’41.43″ E

Station: Jimbocho Station, Tokyo Metro Hanzomon Line

Worth it? For a nice stroll, books, music, or sports.

Our Rating: ⭑⭑⭑⭑

Updated 3/12/2021

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

Jimbocho is a small town in north central Tokyo about 1/2 a mile to the north of the Imperial Palace and the Otemachi area. It’s known as Tokyo’s book town. But it also has a wide variety of sports + music shops – especially for skiing and snowboarding. You can spend a whole day strolling east-west on Yasukuni-Dori Ave (Rt. 403). checking out the shops. There are endless bookstores in the area with every kind of book imaginable.

Access

To get to Jimbocho, take the Tokyo Metro Hanzomon Line and get off at Jimbocho Station. You can also easily walk/bike from Akihabara/Otemachi/Tokyo Dome City.

Area Layout

Central Jimbocho facing north. Yasukuni-Dori runs east-west in sort of an inverted arc shown here running throught the center of town. This street is lined with endless sports/book/music shops, cafés, and restaurants. To the north is Ochanomizu, to the east (right) is Akihabara and Kanda, and to the south is Otemachi and the Imperial Palace. Tokyo Dome City is to the northwest, out of frame.

Extended view facing north. Jimbocho is in the center, Akihabara on the right, TDC at the upper-left, and Imperial Palace to the south, just out of view.

The central + west side of Jimbocho is better described in our Kanda Superguide. We’ll detail just the basic area here. Essentially Yasukuni-Dori (Rt. 403) runs east-west in an arc through the center of town.

There are endless backstreets + streets full of book stores. Most of the major sporting + music shops are along Yasukuni-Dori. There are dozens of interesting guitar shops along the way.

The Hidden Pedestrian Side Street

At around 35°41’43.31″ N 139°45’39.23″ E – just across from a Xerbio Sports store and right next to an ABC-Mart shoe store is the entrance to a charming little side street off-limits to vehicle traffic. There are dozens of nice restaurants + cafés and other shops up + down this street. If you walk this street a few blocks to the west and then turn right on Rt. 301 (Hakusan-Dori) it will take you right into TDC. Turning left on the main street next to ABC instead of taking the side street will lead you to glitch Coffee (discussed next). If you continue walking far enough south past glitch Coffee it will take you to the Imperial Palace and Otemachi.

This street is shown in the 1st video below by NIPPON WANDERING TV.

glitch Coffee

At around 35°41’37.52″ N 139°45’40.50″ E just to the south of Yasukuni Dori is glitch Coffee. The shop is excellent, but’s in a run-down non-descript old office bldg. with only a sign in the window. Don’t let the appearance fool you – it’s worth a trip. See our full review.

Facing north into Jimbocho from Otemachi. glitch Coffee is the small pink bldg. on the right. Yasukuni-Dori is just a few blocks straight ahead.

Yonemoto Coffee Shop

At around 35°41’32.82″ N 139°45’48.60″ E just to the south a few blocks off Yasukuni-Dori and several blocks east of glitch is the Yonemoto Coffee Shop – it’s on a corner and a very nice place to rest + get a brew. It’s popular with early-morning local workers. There is a larger main shop by the same company east of Ginza near Tsukiji.

Yonemoto Coffee Shop – just a few blocks east of glitch.

4-11-1, Tsukiji, Chuo 104-0045 Tokyo Prefecture+81 3-3541-6473

WATERRAS + Ochanomizu

If you walk a mile or so west on Yasukuni-Dori, then turn north (left) onto Rt. 405 (Sotobori-Dori), you’ll come to the sister city of Ochanomizu where there is a spectacular complex called WATERRAS around 35°41’50.39″ N 139°46’03.98″ E. There is also a very nice organic Olympic grocery in the basement of WATERRAS. If you’re up for a bit of a walk, WATERRAS is worth the quick tirp.

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

Just to the west of WATERRAS 2 blocks is a Greek Orthodox church with spectacular Russian architecture called Holy Ressurection Cathedral.

North to Ueno, east to Akihabara.

If you head north of WATERRAS and cross the Kanda River, then head onto Rt. 452 north for about 1 mile you will come to the famous Tokyo district of Ueno.

You can also cross the Kanda River, then head east a few blocks, then north a few blocks again to Akihabara which is only a few miles to the northeast.

Additional Photos

Facing west on Yasukuni-Dori. Note the sidewalk Metro portal on the right.

Head north off Yasukuni-Dori here for WATERRAS.

Conclusion

Jimbocho is a nice little town worth a stroll. It’s usually low-tourist, and low-crowd, which makes it easy. It’s well worth a quick trip or day trip from any of the other local major areas such as Otemachi, Akihabara, or TDC. Check it out.

LINKS

Jimbōchō, Tokyo – Wikipedia

Jimbōchō Station – Wikipedia

Hanzomon Line

Hanzomon Line Posts | Ten Minute Tokyo

Ōtemachi Superguide | Ten Minute Tokyo

Kanda Superguide | Ten Minute Tokyo

Glitch Coffee, Kanda-Jimbocho | Ten Minute Tokyo

Chiyoda City

Kanda & Jimbocho | The Official Tokyo Travel Guide, GO TOKYO

Jimbocho Book Town Things to Do

Jimbocho Book Town

Jimbocho Area Guide | Tokyo Cheapo

10 Great Things to Do in Jimbocho | Tokyo Creative Travel

Jimbocho: Spending A Day In Tokyo’s Book District – Savvy Tokyo

Jimbocho Winter Sports Shop Street – Japan Travel

Jimbocho Guide – Japan Talk

Jimbocho: Tokyo’s Used Bookstore District

Japan Trip 2009: Jinbocho – Comics212.net

VIDS