Tokyo Station Superguide Part 2: Yaesu

Name: Tokyo Station

Kind: Station/Multi-use

Free Wifi: Yes

Location: 35°40’49.41″ N 139°46’07.51″ E

Station: Tokyo Station

Our Rating: ⭑⭑⭑⭑⭑

Worth it? Don’t miss it.

Updated 4/17/2021

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

For general info on Tokyo Station see Part 1 of our series.

The east side of Tokyo Station is called the Yaesu side (named after the 17th century foreign Samurai Jan Joosten).

It’s the newer more modern side of the station compared with the west Marunouchi side built in the early 1900’s.

Access

For access + area layout info for the station see Part 1 of our post which has all the ways to get to Tokyo Station.

Design

The east side is one long continuous sidewalk on the outside with a large bus stop + loading area, a central entrance, the large DAIMARU depato (department store), and an elevated walkway with some shops called GRANRoof. There is also a very cheap hidden luggage store/forward place in a hidden basement at the very south end.

Underneath the east side are endless corridors, passages, and a huge shopping mall. The main street running north-south in front of the east side is called Sotobori Dori. Across the street to the east are shops, the huge Yamada Denki (an electronics shop called Concept LABi), and some very interesting side streets with lots to see + do. There are also some very nice hotels on the east side.

Just to the north of the DAIMARU depato is a very upscale hotel – the Shangri La Hotel Tokyo. You can’t find a better or more convenient hotel in Tokyo, but it will cost you dearly – close to $500/night or even more during peak tourist season in the spring. The only closer hotel is the Tokyo Station Hotel itself – inside the station.

Facing south. The station is center right. The DAIMARU building is right of that, and the Shangri La is on the far right. On the left is the Yamada Denki Concept LABi store. The street shown is Sotobori Dori. Just down to the left past Yamada are some interesting side streets that are a must-see.

At the very south end are some shops on the outside including a very nice 2-story waffle house. If you turn right and follow a small corridor past the corner, then take the nondescript elevator down, you’ll find a hidden luggage storage/delivery service with very cheap rates. This place comes in incredibly handy when going to/from the station with luggage. If you are arriving in Tokyo you can drop your luggage here overnight, then come back the next day and pick it up. They can also deliver to your hotel.

The Yaesu Central Entrance. The huge staircase + escalators lead to the underground shopping mall. The stairs on the left lead up to GRANRoof.

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The Nihombashi (north) Entrance

Just north of the Shangri La around the corner to the left is the smaller north, or Nihombashi entrance to the station. This entrance is mostly used for buses, but also has some other unique features – the Sagawa luggage delivery/storage service is here, as are a few restaurants and a large bank of coin lockers. (Nihombashi is the district just north of Tokyo Station).

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The Nihombashi Entrance.

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The large bank of coin lockers along the north side. An entrance to 1st Avenue underground mall is on the left.

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Along the Yaesu side. The bus loading area is on the left. The Yaesu Central Entrance is just to the right out of frame. Small food shops are at the far end. Just behind the camera is the DAIMARU depato:

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The roof mezzanine level which has many shops on the left side. This level also affords a spectacular view of the city to the east.

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Surprisingly, just outside is a free + large place to park bikes. And you don’t even need to lock them. Hardly anyone in Japan steals anything.

Inside

We described the vast tunnels + platforms inside the station in Part 1 so we won’t go into it again here. Suffice it to say there are 2 sides to the station and underneath are vast shop/restaurant areas with endless things to eat. It’s so vast it’s easy to get lost. You’re going to need a lot of food after spending hours walking around the place and up + down stairs.

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In one of many corridors inside Tokyo Station.

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After walking miles in the station, you will be ready to eat.

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Inside the station there are endless food options + goodies.

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Sakura Street

Just east of the station and 1 block south of the Yamada Denki building is the entrance to a small side street known simply as Sakura Street:

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If you’re visiting the station for the 1st time, this street is a must-see. But wait until after dark when the street comes alive with restaurants, cafés, pubs, and a host of other cool places to check out. There are also a few other good smaller hotels on this streets such as:

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and

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Sakura Street comes alive after dark.

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One of many parallel side streets near Sakura Street. Lots to see + do.

Head Further East

At the end of Sakura Street just 2 blocks east around 35°40’49.19″ N 139°46’20.99″ E is another major north-south street with lots to do. There’s a huge museum here (Artizon Museum), lots of skyscrapers, and a huge Takashimaya depato. The restaurant level on the top floor of the Takashimaya Annex is especially good. If you want a really good hamburger, try Brozer’s on that floor:

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Nihombashi Takashimaya Shopping Center

2-4-1 Nihombashi, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 103-8265
Phone +81-3-3211-4111

More Cool Stuff On the Backstreets

If you wander around the backstreets you will find a surprisingly awesome array of cool things to do + see – not just on Sakura Street, but on all of the streets. Places such as these:

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Coin Lockers

There are huge banks of paid coin lockers around the station. The largest banks are near the shinkansen entrances, along the north corridor, and along the west corridor. To learn how to use them, see Part 1. You can pay by cash, coin, or electronic Suica card. (the Japanese word for card is a Katakana loan word from English: cardo).

The lockers can come in handy when entering or leaving the country, going to other cities in Japan, or if you are just taking a day trip and don’t want to carry everything with you. They are usually totally secure.

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Large lockers. The red indicator usually means they are in use.

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Locker payment machine. The touchscreen at the top indicates how you would like to pay, and the small oval below it is the Suica card reader. After indicating payment by Suica, just slap your card on the reader and the price will be deducted from the card. You can also use bills + coins.

Prepaid IC Cards in Japan: How to Use - Japan Rail Pass

Conclusion

Well that’s it for Tokyo Station. We’ve barely scratched the surface here. The station is vast and you can easily spend days exploring it. It’s a must-see on any trip to Tokyo. Don’t miss it.

Additional Photos

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The Shangri-La Hotel.

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Across from the north entrance is this employment agency – PASONA.

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Inside the north entrance.

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The underground Yaesu Shopping Mall which is vast.

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Heading down into the Ginza Metro subway line.

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Inside the underground 1st Avenue mall.

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10 floors of electronics mayhem in Concept LABi.

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Inside Concept LABi. The wall of iPhone cases alone is gigantic.

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The view east from the roof mezzanine.

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One of many restaurants on the roof mezzanine level.

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The R.L. Waffle Café at the very south end.

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One of the Shinkansen (bullet train) entrances. Note the bank of coin lockers on the left.

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3 of the major Metro lines in Tokyo Station: Marunouchi, Chiyoda, and Tozai lines.

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There are even entire grocery stores inside the station.

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A specialty store inside DAIMARU.

Entrance to the Shangri-La Hotel. There is also an upscale Sarabeth’s above on the 2nd floor. The station is to the left, out of frame.

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Area to the east of the station.

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Area northeast of the station.

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Main entrance to Takashimaya.

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The Annex has some really great places to eat.

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Stairs on the Yaesu side leading up to GRANRoof mezzanine.

GRANRoof mezzanine.

At the south end of the Yaesu side. The hidden luggage elevator is just to the left.

Heading into the north entrance.

In the underground shopping mall.

And the ubiquitous Hello Kitty shop in the underground mall.

LINKS

The Complete Guide to Tokyo Station – LIVE JAPAN

Sagawa Luggage Service

VIDS

For many interesting vids around the station, see Part 1.

Tokyo Station Superguide Part 1: Marunouchi

Name: Tokyo Station

Kind: Station/Multi-use

Free Wifi: Yes

Location: 35°40’49.41″ N 139°46’07.51″ E

Station: Tokyo Station

Our Rating: ⭑⭑⭑⭑⭑

Worth it? Don’t miss it.

Updated 4/15/2021

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

Tokyo Station is Tokyo’s showplace train station + vast multiuse complex.

Renovated + expanded in 2012 the area is an entire city unto itself. In fact, there’s an entire area inside called Tokyo Station City (TSC) – most of it underground beneath and around the station. There are several subdevelopments inside such as TSC, GRANRoof (an elevated outdoor walkway), 1st Avenue underground mall, and others. A new high-rise development just northeast is being planned called Tokyo Torch, which when completed will be Japan’s tallest building. TSC also has its own YouTube channel. Check out the Tokyo Colors.2015 Teaser movie.

There are also huge food palaces, and a large street-level shopping complex with various depatos (department stores), the largest of which is DAIMARU. Inside the station in many areas, there are endless food courts and high-end restaurants + cafés.

Tokyo Station hosts a huge number of train lines and is one of the central departure points for many of Japan’s high speed Shinkansen (bullet trains – shinkansen literally means “new rapid line”). The main lines are Japan Railways (JR) lines, and other lines such as Keio, Tokyo Metro subway and others. You can get to just about any place in the Tokyo region on regular and express trains, and to other parts of Japan on shinkansen.

The station is centered in the central business district called Marunouchi (literally “Imperial Palace Grounds Circle”) in Tokyo just east of the Imperial Palace.

The area is too huge + vast to cover everything so we’ll just hit the major features and points of interest here. To truly experience the station + area, you’ll have to plan on spending a few days walking or biking around.

There are 2 sides to the station – the older but renovated brick side on the west called the Marunouchi side, and the newer, more modern east side called the Yaesu (pronounced ‘Yah-eh-soo’) side (named after one of Japan’s only foreign Samurai, Jan Joosten, or simply Yayōsu for short, from the 17th century) . There are only 2 internal passages which connect the 2 sides the Yaesu North Passage on the north side of the station, and the Yaesu Central Passage in the middle of the station. The two major shinkansen entry areas are also in the center of the station slightly towards the east side. There is also the Yokosuka-Sobu Line Rapid Line to Narita Airport on the west side.

There is actually a smaller 3rd side called the Nihombashi Entrance on the far northeast corner of the station. This entrance/exit is largely used for busses, but if you need to go north of the station, this is the exit to take. There is also a luggage delivery service and a few cafés inside along with coin lockers (see below).

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Northwest side of the station + entrance. There is also a luggage forwarding + a large tourist info office just inside.

Tokyo Station and the Marunouchi area are incredibly spectacular + clean and are the showplace of Tokyo. You won’t want to miss it for anything.

Also on the west side right in the center of the station is the incredibly luxurious and ornate Tokyo Station Hotel, which runs about $400/night.

At the very south entrance on the west side there is also a small Koban (police box). There isn’t much else on the exterior of the west side – most of the interesting points are inside, or in the surrounding area. The west side facadé was renovated in 2012, along with the ornate northwest entrance area which has soaring Victorian ceilings.

An important point of interest to note is that the quickest way to get from Tokyo Station to the west side of the city (to Shinjuku) is on an express line called the JR Chuo Line which departs Tokyo Station and only makes 5 stops on the way to Shinjuku (which is the busiest train station in Tokyo and in the world).

One word of warning: the interior of the station, its passageways, tunnels, platforms, shopping, and routes to other areas can be daunting. You can easily get lost or walk for hours underground. Sometimes it can take over an hour to get to a particular platform or train line.

In this article we’ll cover only the Marunouchi side and the western surrounding area. See Part 2 for the east Yaesu side.

Access

Nearly all lines in Tokyo lead one way or another to Tokyo Station. There are so many lines + platforms in the station it’s impossible to list them all here. Check out the JR Tokyo Station website or the TSC website for a complete list of lines + maps.

On foot or bike Tokyo Station is an easy walk from many of the other parts of the city: Akihabara and Kanda to the north, Yurakucho + Ginza to the south, Otemachi which is just to the north, or even Ueno further north. From Ueno you can even walk to Tokyo Dome City. The JR Yamanote Line runs to Kanda, Akihabara, Ueno, Nippori, and Yurakucho/Ginza.

There are also dozens of sidewalk street-level portals in the area which lead down into the station. Don’t forget that when you are walking around the streets, below you the station is everywhere.

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A station street portal.

There are 2 main streets running north-south on the west side of the station and both are interesting walks. There are endless hotels, shops, business, skyscrapers, and cafés everywhere. You can stroll around for hours and not see it all.

Shuttles

There is also a free Marunouchi Shuttle with an app, but the app is in Japanese only currently. The TSC site has a complete list of all shuttles.

Area Layout

Overhead view facing north. The station with tracks runs north-south shown right of center. The Yurakucho area (see below) at the bottom, and the Imperial Palace is in the upper left corner. The 2 parks are to the center left and lower left. Out of view to the lower right is Ginza. The Marunouchi area is to the top, center.

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The central Marunouchi (west) side of Tokyo Station. The Tokyo Station Hotel is in the center. When Tokyo Torch is completed, it will be just to the left of the skyscrapers shown above.

The south entrance on the west side. Note the turret architecture that was popular in Japan in the early 1900’s when the station was built.

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Also inside the north entrance is a central information booth.

Facing west into the Marunouchi area at the south end of the station. There is a spectacular view of the entire area from the rooftop observation deck in the KITTE building on the left. If you head left (south) from here in a few blocks you will come to Yurakucho. Marunouchi Plaza (see next) is just on the right out of frame.

Marunouchi Plaza

Outside the west side of the station is a large open air plaza called Marunouchi Plaza. It’s mostly just a walking + photo area but provides epic views of the station. There is also a small Metro subway portal here. If you head further west across the street there’s another long paved walkway leading to the Imperial Palace. In the fall the Ginko trees along this walkway turn a brilliant yellow. If you’re there in the fall, it’s not to be missed.

Just to the north and south of the 2nd walkway, there are 2 parks worth checking out around 35°40’57.67″ N 139°45’38.80″ E. To the south is the huge Kōkyogaien National Garden, and to the north a small concrete park with a large fountain called Wadakura Fountain Park. There are various other spectacular hotels around the area.

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Ginko trees in the fall to the west of Tokyo Station.

KITTE + Observation Deck.

At the south end of the plaza, there’s a large white bldg. called KITTE. It offers several levels of indoor shops, food, and a spectacular open-air rooftop garden affording epic views of the station. It’s a breathtaking view and not to be missed. Just enter on the north side and take the escalator up. Totally Drew has a nice vid of the deck in the vid section below. KITTE also has a nice tourist + business info office with people ready to assist you, should the need arise.

Also currently just across the street from KITTE is Tokyo’s largest  Store, in a very retro-70’s style office building at street level.

South to Yurakucho

If you head south past KITTE on side streets, in just a few blocks you’ll be in the Yurakucho/Ginza area, and you’ll pass the nice Tokyo International Forum along the way. Both Yurakucho/Ginza, and Akihabara/Kanda are easy walks from the station.

Mitsubishi Ichigokan Museum

2 blocks to the southeast is a huge museum called the Mitsubishi Ichigokan Museum. The entire 3-story building is done in early British/American colonial brick style and is a must-see. The museum mostly offers rotating collections of paintings + other artwork. There is also a very nice café + garden.

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Mitsubishi Ichigokan Museum

Food

There is endless food at and around Tokyo Station. From ramen joints to deluxe upscale resturants to food courts, you won’t be able to decide. The station is full of food stalls, shops, a central store area with shops selling sweets, delicacies, and all kinds of meals. There are also food courts in the underground tunnels at various intervals.

Perhaps the biggest food extraveganza at Tokyo Station is the food tower in the DAIMARU depato (department store), but that is on the Yaesu (east) side so we’ll save that for Part 2.

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The central shops area inside the station which includes dessert places such as TokyoMe+.

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There are also endless large complexes on the streets around the station such as M Lounge just to the northeast.

1st Avenue Underground Mall

In approximately the center of the west side inside the station near the shops is the entrance to a large underground mall called 1st Avenue. The mall is vast and has all kinds of shops, although many of them such as the Pokemon and LEGO stores seem to be targeted at kids. Still worth a quick look.

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Coin Lockers

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There are several huge banks of coin lockers inside Tokyo Station. Some are along corridors between platforms and areas, but the largest banks are on the west side across from the central shops area, and near the entrances to the shinkansen areas. You can drop your stuff in them to lighten your load, or when traveling on trains, but it will cost you. Small lockers run about $8 USD/24 hours, large ones can cost as much as $14-$19/24 hours. They also accept Tokyo’s Suica IC payment card. To use them, drop your stuff in, then lock it and take the key if there is one. If not, use the touch-screen panel to select + secure your locker. You generally pay when you return to unlock and retrieve your items. Some lockers do require you to pay in advance. Lockers can also come in handy when transporting luggage coming/going to airports or other cities. If you’re looking for a cheaper option, you can find dirt cheap street lockers around Tokyo as low as $4/day such as this hidden bank in Ueno:

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Otemachi to the Northwest

Just to the northwest is a small sister city area called Otemachi. It’s also part of the business district and in fact, is connected underground to Tokyo Station by long vast tunnels + walkways. You can walk in about 45 minutes, but the path underground is complex and requires you to traverse several different levels, shopping centers, stairs, escalators, and walkways. So be prepared. There are also lots of things to see and do around Otemachi including mixed-use complexes such as Otemachi One and Ootemori. But this leads us to the final topic for this post…

Hanzomon Hell

The Hanzomon Line is a Tokyo Metro subway which runs east-west near Tokyo Station and which can be accessed underground in both Tokyo Station and Otemachi Station. But this is where it gets tricky: The Hanzomon Line station is on the far side of Otemachi, but signs underground in Tokyo Station point your way there. The hard part is that many of the Hanzomon Line signs in Tokyo Station merely list the distance to the next part of the path you have to follow. Just when you think you’re there, you have to walk another 350 meters – multiple times. In fact, it’s several miles of walking on a convoluted path to get from Tokyo Station to the actual Hanzomon Line platform in Otemachi Station. So, if you decide to go this route, be prepared for serious walking. On the upside, there are a lot of interesting things along the way and lots of food courts, cafés and other places to stop and rest if need be. This walk is generally known among expats as Hanzomon Hell because it’s no quick trip even though the signs would lead you to believe otherwise. So, we’re just warning you: be prepared to walk. A lot.

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Walking from Tokyo Station to the Hanzomon Line in Otemachi underground – aka Hanzomon Hell.

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Ootemori

Conclusion

Tokyo Station/Marunouchi is one of the most spectacular areas of Tokyo and is not to be missed at any cost. If you want to see just one area of Tokyo, this is it. It’s huge, elegant, spotless, awe-inspiring, and astonishing. It’s an experience you’re not likely to forget in your lifetime. A must-see.

In Part 2, we’ll cover the eastern, more lively, Yaesu side of the station.

Additional Photos

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Another view of the KITTE building from the north.

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To the northwest side of the plaza there are several large multi-use/shopping centers. Very upscale.

tourist info office
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The JR luggage forwarding/pickup office just inside the northwest entrance. You can have your luggage forwarded from airports/hotels for a fee and pick it up here. And vice-versa when leaving. The tourist info office is on the opposite side behind the camera. There are other luggage services around the station such as Sagawa Express.

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Inside the newly rennovated northwest entrance. The main gate entrance is on the right, and the Yaesu side passage is ahead.

One of the shinkansen entrances.

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The vastness around Marunouchi that is corporate Japan.

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There are plenty of interesting things to see and do around Otemachi just a few blocks from Tokyo Station as well.

There are several street-level area maps such as this one in various places outside the station.

LINKS

Tokyo Station – Wikipedia

Tokyo Station Map

Tokyo Station City

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCi7bZHckQlThRDOBLd1mfGQ/videos

Tokyo Station Shopping Guide

Complete Guide to Tokyo Station – LIVE JAPAN

Tokyo Station Area Guide

Discover Tokyo Station and our station map- Your Japan Rail Pass

The Prime Info Spot for your Sightseeing Needs: “Tokyo City i” Tourist Information Center

Narita – Tokyo: choosing your itinerary | Japan Rail Pass

JR Yamanote Line: Tokyo Station to Tamachi | Japan Rail Pass

https://www.japanvisitor.com/japan-city-guides/japan-stations/tokyo-station

A day out at Tokyo Station – WAttention.com

https://trulytokyo.com/daimaru-department-store/

https://www.gotokyo.org/en/spot/623/index.html

https://trulytokyo.com/daimaru-department-store/

KITTE | The Official Tokyo Travel Guide, GO TOKYO

KITTE Marunouchi

https://marunouchi.jp-kitte.jp/gb/information.jsp

Tokyo Station Hotel

23 of the most popular souvenirs

https://www.tokyoeki-1bangai.co.jp/en/

All hotels in Tokyo

TOKYO TORCH|Mitsubishi Estate Office Information

Live Tokyo Webcams

VIDS

This vid gives a gorgeous, haunting view of the station and area in 4K.

This video gives great 4K views of the malls under Tokyo Station.

The Great Tokyo Donut Post

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Updated 3/12/21

Like the current pancake craze in Tokyo at the moment, Japan is crazy for donuts. There are so many cool donuts in Japan it’s hard to know where to start.

The real donut crazes hit around Halloween + Christmas – 2 major holdays in Japan. Halloween especially is huge. Spring is also a big donut time in Japan – mostly with all kinds of Sakura donuts everywhere.

The biggest donut chain in Japan is Mr. Donut – a US chain that went bankrupt in the US, but was bought by a Japanese company. There are 1000s of Mr. Donut stores all over Tokyo and Japan. We have some more info on Mr. Donut on our other post Inside a Japanese Post Office.

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Mr. Donut right next to Akabane Station in Akabane.

Another Mr. Donut.

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A Mister Donut “set” from back in 2001. Today’s donuts are a bit more colorful + themed.

Donuts @ Tokyo Station

Tokyo Station and it’s underground shopping area, Tokyo Station City are vast and there are lot of doughnut options here:

Angelique New York

Dunkin

Siretoco Factory in Keiyo Street area

Yurakucho

The Doughnut Plant: There’s a great little donut shop in Yurakucho called The Doughnut Plant. Well worth a stop. It’s 1 block to the north and west of Yurakucho Station and 1 block west of the Tokyo International Forum around 35°40’35.99″ N 139°45’47.31″ E. They close nightly @ 7PM. Yurakucho is just south of Tokyo Station.

Krispy Kreme: Just to the south of Tokyo Station is Yurakucho Station and right next to its east exit is the ITOCIA dept. store. There’s a Krispy Kreme shop inside.

Yurakucho Station ahead, and ITOCIA dept. store, left.

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Another view of Yurakucho Station right, and ITOCIA dept. store, left, out of view.

ITOCIA dept. store, right.

AkihabaraJack In The Donuts, Mr. Donut + More

Jack In The Donuts: Just outside Yodobashi Akihabara is a small donut shop called Jack In The Donuts. You can watch workers prepare donuts live + they have a great variety of donuts including matcha donuts. The shop is hidden in a small shopping tunnel just on the south side of Yodobashi Camera. Well worth a stop.

There is also a Mr. Donut about 5 blocks northwest of the JR Akihabara Station.

Fukushima Tasting Market: 2 blocks to the east of the Mr. Donut here is the Fukushima Tasting Market which also has a pastry shop with lots of donuts. Well worth a stop and nearby.

Mont-Thabor Tōkyō: A little to the west just across the Kanda River is a shop called Mont-Thabor Tōkyō Waterras Mall Shop. It’s actually in Ochinamizu in the Waterras complex. There is also a Mr. Donut on the north side of Waterras.

Akasaka/Nagatcho

To the east of Akasaka near Nagatcho is a small donut shop called Hocus Pocus which is well worth a stop.

Donuts in Ikebukuro

There are no less than three Mr. Donuts‘ in Ikebukuro in western Tokyo. All of them are great. There is also the Roasted Coffee Lab in the Esola complex just across from one of the Mr. Donuts.

There is also a Krispy Kreme shop 2 blocks west of Ikebukuro Station on Mizuki Dori.

Donuts @ Tokyo Sky Tree

At Tokyo Sky Tree there are lots of places to find great donuts. Head into the Solamachi Bldg. next to Sky Tree to discover its food arcade:

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Right out front near the door is this pastry shop with donuts.

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There is also a western-style Krispy Kreme on the Food Marché floor – as well as other donuteries.

Just to the south of Sky Tree is this Mister Donut. There are also a few more to the west on the way to Asakusa.

Halloween

Halloween is huge in Japan and most cafés go nuts trying to out-do each other in the madness of the Halloween donuts they can come up with. This selection is from Mr. Donut:

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©2019-2020 tenmintokyo.com

Halloween donuts @ Mr. Donut.

Even chain cafés such as Tully’s gets into the act. There are others in smaller privately owned cafes and smaller places such as Peace and Lamb in Q Plaza in Ikebukuro. There is also a CAPCOM Café in Q Plaza.

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Arnold’s

In Kichijoji is a nice donut shop called Arnold’s. They have some very unusual and interesting doughnuts and it’s worth a look.

Courtesy Arnold’s

Floresta nature doughnuts

To the west in Koenji around is Floresta Nature Donuts. Well worth a stop.

Ginza

For a more upscale doughnut experience, try Antique Ginza 2 blocks east of Yurakucho Station. There’s also a Mr. Donut in Ginza: Mister Donut Ginza Nine.

Dumbo Donuts + Coffee

In Azabujuban is a small donut shop called Dumbo’s. Also worth a stop. Also in Azabujuban is Bryant Coffee.

Harajuku + Omotosando

Higuma Doughnuts + Coffee Wrights

There’s a great little donute shop around 35°40’01.62″ N 139°42’35.34″ E in Omotosando called Higuma Doughnuts along with a coffee shop called Coffee Wrights.

Good Town Donuts Shibuya

In Shibuya there’s a nice spot called Good Town Donuts. They have some very interesting low-sugar Vegan donuts. There’s a good post on the place over at grapejapan.com

Yoyogi

If you’re near Yoyogi Station, check out Harrits Donuts & Coffee just to the northeast a few blocks around 35°40’09.07″ N 139°40’56.20″ E. Unfortunately their site is in Japanese only.

Conclusion

Well that’s about it for now. Tokyo is a donut-lover’s paradise and there’s no end to the funny + delicious donuts you can find here. Enjoy!

LINKS

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http://www.jack-donuts.jp/#

http://www.noacafe.jp/en/harajuku/

https://www.higuma.co/

https://www.misterdonut.jp/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mister_Donut

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https://www.timeout.com/tokyo/restaurants/tokyos-best-doughnuts

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https://www.tokyo-solamachi.jp/en/shop/887/

https://www.tokyo-solamachi.jp/en/shop/?m_category=27&page=7

https://gigazine.net/gsc_news/en/20130911-krispykreme-halloween/

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https://www.roadarch.com/sca/donutsmr.html

https://www.fukushimaya.net/

https://mont-thabor.jp

https://www.waterras.com/

Cute bear doughnut from Hokkaido available at Tokyo station

https://rb.gy/qtl7je

http://www.dumbodc.com/

https://siretoco23.com/free/shop

https://gigazine.net/gsc_news/en/20170925-misterdonut-halloween-my-melody

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