First Official Nintendo Store Opened in Japan

©2019-2020 tenmintokyo.com

Last updated 6/21/2020

Top Things to do in Tokyo: Nintendo Tokyo

Video game maker Nintendo opened its first official store in Shibuya in Nov. 2019. If you’re in Shibuya, check it out.

It’s in the PARCO bldg. @ 35°39’43.64″ N 139°41’56.36″ E – just south of Hotel Koé.

LINKS

https://store.nintendo.com/

https://www.youtube.com/user/Nintendo

https://www.timeout.com/tokyo/news/japans-first-official-nintendo-store-to-open-in-tokyo-on-november-22

https://jw-webmagazine.com/nintendo-tokyo-the-first-official-nintendo-store-in-japan/

https://www.timeout.com/tokyo/news/japans-first-official-nintendo-store-to-open-in-tokyo-on-november-22

VIDS

LUMINE Ikebukuro Food Court

Name: LUMINE Ikebukuro

Kind: Depato

Location: 35°43’43.85″ N 139°42’33.51″ E

The food courts on floors 7 + 8 of LUMINE Ikebukuro are amazing. Shop after shop of high quality food at reasonable prices. A few really good burger joints, all kinds of cafés, and sweets, pancake + sundae places, and higher end restaurants on the 8th floor.

LUMINE is at the south west end of Ikebukuro JR station. Take the Metropolitain exit, head just to the left down the sidewalk, past TOBU depato, then under the high metal beam roof. The escalators are right there. Take one to the top floors.

The food basement in the TOBU bldg. right next door is great too.

So… here’s how to get there:

  1. Exit JR Ikebukuro Station at the west or Metropolitan (Theater) exit. This is on the west/southwest side of the station.
  2. You’ll come up stairs when exiting, there will be a tiny Starbucks on the right, a TOBU depato on the left. You’ll be out in a small square with some shops across the street.
  3. Head south, past the TOBU store, sticking to the far left of the sidewalk. If you’re to the right of the Taito Station, you’re too far west.
  4. After you pass the TOBU bldg, go about another block and you’ll see another JR station exit like this:

It says “West Entrance” but it’s really the Southwest entrance on a map. There’s another exit called South Exit inside the building south of this. Either west or south exits will do.

The real JR map of the station is here, but it doesn’t really show this entrance.

5. Walk past this entrance, sticking to the left, and you’ll come into an area with a bunch of escalators, and some shops, and coin lockers:

This is what you want – board the escalators to the top floors to find the restuarants. Note the “M” on the building. This used to be called the “Metropolitain Building” but is now called LUMINE.

As a footnote, just to the right on this photo – by the exit from the escaltors, there are all kinds of interesting shops – there’s a Coffee Roasters Laboratory Cafe, a Mr. Donut (in fact 2 of them on that side of the station), and a few blocks south, a MOS Burger. There is also another shopping area near the Coffee Roasters called Esola.

2nd footnote: Just to the north of the Starbucks mentioned above, there is a huge JR Travel Service Center which has lots of info, train bookings, and other useful traveller info.

Just west down the street past the Taito Station mentioned there is a large Bic Camera annex, and beyond that further west, a OIOI depato. Keep in mind there are 5 Bic Camera stores around Ikebukuro station.

All of these places are within a few blocks of each other.

So, if you’re in the mood for nice food courts, and sellers, check out the LUMINE food court shown above, and the food seller basement in the TOBU depato next door. Both are outstanding.

Links

LUMINE floor guide

LUMINE Ikebukuro

https://www.lumine.ne.jp/english/ikebukuro/

TOBU Ikebukuro

Depachika Delights: The Underground Food Halls of Tokyo

Tokyo Food Guide

Map:

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=esola+ikebukuro&t=ffab&ia=places&iai=%E3%82%A8%E3%82%BD%E3%83%A9%E6%B1%A0%E8%A2%8B-%E8%B1%8A%E5%B3%B6%E5%8C%BA-2&iaxm=places

Japanese Groceries

Despite what you may think Japan actually has some pretty awesome grocery stores. And their prices are pretty reasonable – in some cases less than the US.

And their products and fresh foods seem to be of higher quality.

There are several large chains – Life, YorkMart, Marutetsu, and others.

Don’t confuse these stores with conbini – convenience stores – such as Lawson, Family Mart, and 7-11, which many Japanese live out of for food.

Japanese are not big on buying huge carts of food and storing it – most Japanese will stop on the way home from work and get something for a day or two. Their refrigerators are much smaller too – even full sized ones can be as small as 1/4 the size of a US fridge.

There are some good deals in grocery stores – fresh seafood abounds. So do vegetables. Prices are about the same as the US – sometimes lower.

Portions are smaller, but not by much – and seem to be much fresher.

Unlike in US stores, in general you checkout, then bag your own groceries out of your basket on a small side counter deisgned for that purpose.

There is also a general drug-food chain of smaller stored called Welcia which sometimes has some good discount deals on food and snackes. If you’re in the mood for something like a box of butter cookies, you might able to find them at Welcia for $1.

The Japanese discount store Don Quijote also has a food section – some stores have a better selection than others. You can find some good deals here for ¥100 or under a few dollars. It pays to look around.

7-11 even sells food with English labels on them in most J groceries. In this case a large piece of smoked salmon for under $3. Very cheap + good.

Coffee + tea at a large Don Quijote.

Corn Dogs on sale on @ YorkMart. Not the healthiest – but cheap. 3 for under $2.

Cruise 0n up on your bike, and load up on good cheap groceries @ YorkMart.

Huge Don Quijote in downtown Ikebukuro – second bldg. from right. If you can stand the 7 floors of stairs + incredibly narrow aisles, you can find some deals.

“Ekimae” in Japanese means “In front of the station”.

Yogurt for around $1 in Don Quijote – yes, it’s possible to eat really cheap – and well – in Japan.

Sardines in Don Quijote.

Tiny cheese @ Don Quiojte for under a $1.

A minituare jar of hachi mitsu (honey) in Don Quijote for under $1. Perfect for sweetening coffee without using sugar.

You can even find dessert for under $1 in Don Quiojte.

BUT……

Having said all that, hands down the very best food shopping in Tokyo is at MEGA Don Quijote in Shibuya. It’s just up the hill from Shibuya 109 on the north side. Just cross the street to the right at the 109 entrance and head northwest up the hill. MEGA Don Quiojte is just a few blocks up on the right. Head to B1 level for the best selection of good, cheap food you can find in Tokyo. There are great deals in their meat section if you’re a meat lover. Plenty of other good deals too. Watch for sales. Shopping here is a great way to eat cheap in Tokyo.

MEGA Don Quijote in Shibuya, Japan.

Loads of great meals cheap.

High-quality fresh produce cheap too.

Bag of bean sprouts – ¥28

Some pretty high quality meat for low prices too.

Even a cheesecake with milk from Hokkaido.

Also – if you like good burgers, just down the street 2 blocks is one of the best MOS Burgers in Japan.

LINKS

7 SURPRISES WHEN YOU FIRST VISIT A JAPANESE SUPERMARKET

https://www.thetokyochapter.com/surprises-when-you-first-hit-the-japanese-supermarket/

https://www.tokyocreative.com/articles/18922-supermarkets-in-japan

https://www.welcome-aeon.com/

How to Buy Cheap Food in Japan

International Supermarkets in Tokyo

VIDS

Check out the Critical Eats Japan channel – lots of good food vids.