Ikebukuro Superguide

Name: Ikebukuro

Kind: Town

Free Wifi: Yes

Location: 35°44’05.39″ N 139°42’27.83″ E

Station: JR Ikebukuro Station, Seibu Ikebukuro Line, Marunouchi Line, Yurakucho Line, Fukutoshin Line

Worth it? A must-see.

Our Rating: ⭑⭑⭑⭑

Updated 8/11/2021

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Also see our guide to Ikebukuro Underground.

Ikebukuro is a hip, quirky hang out spot in central western Tokyo. Smaller than Shibuya or Shinjuku, it’s often overlooked by tourists. Ikebukuro has a fun small-town vibe, yet still feels cosmopolitain enough to be exciting. There is more than plenty to do. In fact, you could spend a few days in Ikebukuro and barely scratch the surface. Around every corner + down every side street is something surprising + interesting. The fact that it’s not overcrowded the way other major areas of Tokyo are only adds to it charm.

Access

To get to Ikebukuro you have several options: the JR Yamanote or Saikyo Lines, the Seibu Ikebukuro Line, or Marunouchi Line, Yurakucho Line, or Fukutoshin Line on the Tokyo Metro.

You can also walk or bike to Ikebukuro from Shinjuku to the south, or from Itabashi to the north. The walk from Itabashi is just over 1 mile.

You can also walk from Meijiro Station 1 stop south on the Yamanote Line along a quiet charming side street which runs north-south along the train tracks.

JR Ikebukuro Station

The main station is located in the 1st floor + basement of the PARCO depato (department store) in the main station. The Metro lines also exit this station. Just to the south in the SEIBU depato is the Seibu Ikebukuro Line Station. All of them are centrally located in Ikebukuro and are very convenient. There are also several street-level station portals on sidewalks all over the town as shown here:

Courtesy Totally Drew

One of many street-level station entrances.

Courtesy Totally Drew

On the JR Ikebukuro platform, you can purchase a Suica IC card for fares from these machines.

Area Layout

Ikebukuro is centrally arranged with an east, west, north, and south side. The stations are on the main thoroughfare running north-south through the town. The station in the photo above is in the center, the main street is just to the right running north-south, West Gate Park is to the left, center. At the very top center is a huge waste recycling plant with its telltale tall cracking tower. To the east are a dizzying array of side streets with endless shops + restaurants. Just to the east of that out of frame is the Sunshine City complex and 2 Ikebukuro parks (Minami-Ikebukuro Park).

View from the WTC building in west Tokyo facing west: Ikebukuro is the small city in the distance on the right, Shinjuku several miles to the south is on the left in the distance. Just behind Shinjuku, barely visible on the left is Mt. Fuji.

West Side

The town is roughly divided into east, west, and north ends. The south end holds a few interesting spots, but as soon as you leave the main area east of the station, it’s mostly residential. You can get from the east side to the west and vice versa by passing directly through the center of JR Ikebukuro Station.

West Gate Park

At the West Gate Exit is a popular meeting spot called West Gate Park. The area was also the title of a popular dorama (drama) TV series in Japan. Also in West Gate Park just to the north of the west gate is a JR Tourist Information Office – which has English-speaking staff. You can also reserve bus tours in the office.

West Gate Park is a large area to the west of the station. There are all sorts of restaurants, cafés, shops, and other attractions. About a block further east are a Bic Camera annex and a block beyond that a OIOI (pronounced Marui) depato. In the OIOI is a very nice Seria 100¥ shop.

OIOI (Marui).

Global Ring + Esola

Just to the south of West Gate Park is a new outdoor performing art center called Global Ring. It was finished in 2020. There is also a café here. Further south is the Metropolitain Theater. 1 block south of that is a very nice MOS Burger.

Also in West Gate Park is a street entrance to the oddly named underground shopping mall Hope Center.

To the north of West Gate Park are endless backstreets. If you head northeast in this direction, you come to a small tunnel north of the station which heads to the east side of the town.

Also on the west side, a few blocks north of the OIOI is the world-famous Sakura Hostel – which although spartan is known for its dirt cheap prices, and fairly clean atmosphere. If you want to stay cheap in Ikebukuro, this is your spot. Sakura Hostel is also known for its huge outdoor seating area for guests. You don’t get much in the way of ammenities – most beds are mere bunks in shared rooms, but for the incredibly cheap price, it’s worth it.

Ikebukuro is also home to some of the largest electronics shops in Tokyo – including Bic Camera, Yamada Denki, and Sofmap.

Just south of West Gate Park is a shopping area called Esola. Check out the Coffee Roasters Laboratory on the ground floor. There’s also another Metro entrance here. Just beyond Esola is the LUMINE complex and MOS Burger.

Here are a few photos from the west side:

Ikebukuro West Gate Park. The JR East Travel Service Center is straight ahead.

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JR East Travel Service Center

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Just south of West Gate Park facing north. Turn left at the next street for OIOI City and the Sakura Hostel. Flip 45 degrees left from this image and you will see Global Ring on your left:

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Facing west, the Metropolitan Theater is the bldg. with the sloped roof straight ahead. The 2nd Bic Camera Annex is the bldg. on the far right. Global Ring is on the far left. Global Ring was built on the real former Ikebukuro West Gate Park – an area which previously had a large fountain. Now the entire area has been replaced by Global Ring.

Facing southeast from the Global Ring area. The Esola complex is straight ahead. The MOS Burger is 2 blocks to the right.

Just beyond Global Ring is the Esola complex (left) and LUMINE (right). LUMINE + TOBU complexes have excellent food courts on their top floors. Don’t miss ’em. LUMINE was formerly called Metropolitain Plaza.

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Inside the station.

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On the JR Saikyo Line platform behind the PARCO depato.

OIOI City west of the station facing west. Turn right here for the Sakua Hostel.

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Seria in OIOI City.

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The west Bic Camera Annex a block east of OIOI City.

East SideEndless Shopping + Restaurants + Sunshine City

The east side of the station is considerably more interesting. Not only is there a main street which runs north to south which has a myriad of shops, cafés, and resturants on it, but there’s an entire area east of that that is really interesting (Sunshine60 Street).

There’s PARCO + SEIBU depatos, and Bic Camera and other denki (electronics) shops on the north end of the street, but the south end of the street also has lots of coffee shops + restaurants.

Sunshine City

Inside underground @ Sunshine City.

To the far east of Sunshine60 Street is a huge skyscraper and complex called Sunshine City. The area’s big attraction is Sunshine 60 – which until recently was one of the tallest skyscrapers in Japan. It has a top-floor observatory not to be missed. There is also a western Mailboxes Etc. CMRA on one of the top floors if you need to get a local mailbox or mail anything to the west.

Hidden away in the basement of Sunshine City is a vast mult-floor shopping mall. You can spend hours in here – and it’s so huge it’s easy to get lost. There is also another entrance to the mall on the east end of the major side street next to the the Tokyu Hands store.

As a historical footnote many locals believe Sunshine 60 to be haunted because after World War 2, the Japanese imperial army general Tojo was executed there. Several Japanese have committed suicide by jumping from its roof. There is also a very nice small park next to the area where you can kick back and chill. Sunshine City is around 35°43’45.15″ N 139°43’05.09″ E.

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Entrance to Sunshine City.

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Street view from Sunshine City‘s 60th floor.

Entrance to Sunshine City Annex on Sunshine60 Street.

To get to Sunshine60 Street, head south from JR Ikebukuro Staiton, turn left (east) at 35°43’48.45″ N 139°42’46.56″ E 2 blocks down, follow the sidewalk as it winds east, then cross at the Milky Way Café and head straight. Make note of this sidewalk and the small alley off it to the left for later below

This puts you right into Sunshine60 Street – the main shopping street. As you come to the end, turn right, then left again for Sunshine City. There is also an entrance to the underground mall part of Sunshine City about a block before the final right turn. You can’t miss it – it has a huge sign on the front of the bldg. next to the Tokyu Hands depato also on the right.

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Main street in east Ikebukuro. Meiji-Dori runs north-south. The JR Ikebukuro Station is up on the left. The white bldg. with the red sign on the left is Bic Camera. Just to the southeast is Yamada Denki (LABi). SEIBU + PARCO depatos are on the far left of the frame above the stations. The street to the left of Bic Camera leads to dozens of other interesting side streets on the north side of town.

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A closer view of the PARCO bldg. on the east side. The JR station entrance is at the bottom of the bldg.

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There’s also a Becker’s burger place just at the east exit of the station.

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SEIBU Ikebukuro Station just south of the JR entrance above.

If you head down this street just across from the JR east station exit, you will discover a wealth of interesting small side streets.

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Entrance to Sunshine60 Street @ the Milky Way Café, right. At the end of this street turn right for Sunshine City.

New South Ikebukuro Park

Around 35°43’41.35″ N 139°43’17.74″ E – just east of Sunshine City is brand new South Ikebukuro Park. Completed in 2020, this stunning new park offers a huge green lawn, a café on the north end, and a large bike parking lot to the south. It’s just 1 block east of Sunshine City so if you’re in the area, check it out:

Courtesy tkviper
Courtesy Nippon Wandering TV

The underground bike park just to the south of South Ikebukuro Park.

Ikebukuro Shopping Plaza (ISP)

In the basement of the station and under the east side of the streets is a small mall called Ikebukuro Shopping Plaza (ISP). There are portals to ISP in the station just before the east exit, as well as one on the sidewalk outside the station and in the middle of the crosswalk facing east. Most of ISP is underground.

Q plaza

About 1/2 way down the main side street to the east is another new complex called Q plaza. Well worth a stop. Lots of good cafés, and a CAPCOM store + café on the 4th floor. The sides streets all around this area are charming to explore and worth a walk. Plan on spending a whole day in the area.

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Food

There are endless food options around Ikebukuro. 2 really awesome places are Darcy’s Beer + Burger and Coffee Valley. Darcy’s has a triple-decker hamburger that is out of this world for $12. Not to be missed. We did a review of both places above. There are also no less than three Mr. Donut places around town – 2 on the West Gate Park side, and 1 older one tucked away on a backstreet on the east side. Not particularly healthy, but delicious. There are also endless ramen and yakiniku (steak) places, and of course, the aforementioned MOS Burger. There’s also a Tully’s Coffee in Q plaza as well as a nice café called Peace and Lamb.

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Food Courts

Japan’s food courts are a throwback to 1950’s-style dining. There are some on the top floors of depatos such as TOBU + SEIBU, and there are other standalone bldgs. which are all restaurants top to bottom. There’s no lack of good dining in Ikebukuro. In particular the food court in TOBU Ikebukuro is awesome – there’s a really great Hawaiian burger place, and lots of other restuarants. PARCO also has a food court + rooftop beer garden. Of course there are endless ramen and yakiniku (steak) places everywhere. As well as fast food.

TOBU also has a basement Depachika (short for “depato basement”) – a huge food floor below ground level which is especially good. Here you can get everything from seafood, to packaged gift food, to deserts. If you’re in Ikebukuro definitely check out the food basement in TOBU.

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Food court on top floor of TOBU on the west side.

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Don’t worry – walking 15 miles/day sightseeing in Tokyo and you’ll burn it all off.

Pancakes – The New Tokyo Craze

A new food craze has hit Tokyo – pancake shops. They’re everywhere. In Ikebukuro there are several good ones but the 2 best are A Happy Pancake and

Around 35°43’48.11″ N 139°42’46.90″ E at the small side street mentioned above, turn left (north) into a small alley and a few stores down you’ll come to A Happy Pancake. This small underground shop has great food. Careful going down the stairs to the basement: they’re steep and there’s no handrail.

In the SEIBU depato a few blocks to the west is Rainbow Pancake – also a must-visit. Both are excellent, and worth the trip. All-in-all we would rate AHP best, but it’s up to you to decide on taste. There is also another AHP in Omotosando.

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If it’s pancakes you want, Tokyo’s got ’em. Lots of ’em.

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There are lots of other pancake places all over Tokyo. Get ready to eat.

Micro Food Stalls

All over Tokyo in stations + in other places you’ll see these tiny little food places everywhere. Most stations have them, and Ikebukuro Station is no different.

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The Japanese love contractions and in this case “Press Butter Sand” means “Pressed Butter Sandwich”.

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Food Trucks

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There are also lots of tiny micro food trucks in Tokyo – such as this crepe truck in Ikebukuro.

Courtesy Tokyo Night Walker

On the east-side backstreets is this great Italian restaurant – Palermo.

Courtesy Tokyo Night Walker

Just next to the oldest of the Mr. Donuts – on the east side – is a small concrete park with lots of food. One of the best places among them is the Saikyou Butter Coffee Shop.

North Side

On the north side the streets are a little less lively but interesting nonetheless. To the northeast just a few blocks is a small concrete park surrounded by restaurants and a large performing arts theather – Brilla Hall. This entire area is being renovated as of 2021. There are endless small side streets in the north end worth exploring. There are in fact, 2 more major north-south streets in the north area full of shops. Both entrances are around 35°43’54.13″ N 139°42’34.12″ E.

More Discount Stores: Don Quijotes + CAN ⭑ DO

Aside from Seria, there are several other discount stores in Ikebukuro. There are 2 Don Quijotes: 1 just northwest of the station, and another just east of the east exit right across the street. There is also a CAN ⭑ DO discount store just south down the street on the east side. Both Don Quijote + CAN ⭑ DO have some good cheap food selections + snacks.

The Don Quijote just to the northwest of the station.

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The east-side Don Quijote across from the station is huge. The food basement is quite good.

Meiji-Dori to Itabashi

You can also walk north on Ikebukuro’s main street on the west side – Meiji-Dori a few miles north to the small town of Itabashi.

Hotels

There are plenty of good hotels in Ikebukuro which won’t break the bank. We recommend checking agoda.com for rates. One of the best, of course, is the APA hotel, which is very clean + upscale but under $70/night in most cases. It is however a bit further to the northwest but can be easily walked from in a few blocks. There is the aforementioned Sakura Hostel, which is great if you’re on a budget. There is also the Hotel Metropolitan – which is upscale and very good, but much more expensive at around $130/night. There is also Sunshine City Prince Hotel.

For Cat Lovers It’s Nekobukuro

The weird cat obsession that is gripping Japan can be found at several cat cafés all over the city, but in Ikebukuro the place for cats is Nekobukuro Cat’s House (ねこぶくろ) – a petting zoo for cats located on the eighth floor of the Ikebukuro Tokyu Hands store. If you’re into cats check out their site at https://nekobukuro.com/ Tokyu Hands is just at the end of the east side street in the small Sunshine City building across from Victoria’s Sports around 35°43’48.45″ N 139°43’00.02″ E.

Victoria’s Sports across the street from Sunshine City.

Conclusion

Ikebukuro is one of Tokyo’s most exciting areas and is a thrill to visit. A must-see. There’s so much to do here plan on spending a couple of days. There are endless places to eat + things to do, yet the area is not so huge that’s it’s overwhelming like some other parts of Tokyo.

Enjoy!

Additional Photos

Facing north just outside the east JR station exit.

Night view from West Gate Park facing south. Global Ring is in the center.

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LUMINE complex.

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Inside LUMINE complex.

At the north end of West Gate Park is this side street. If you turn right here, then left, you’ll find the entrance to the small tunnel which leads to the east side of the station:

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Turn right at the tunnel entrance a few yards ahead to get to the east side.

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As you exit the tunnel on the east side, you’ll see the PARCO building shown here. If you turn south from here, you’ll see the main larger PARCO bldg. and just beyond that, the east entrance to JR Ikebukuro Station.

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Northeast side at night. Yamada Denki is the tall bldg. on the right.

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An early morning West Gate Park tourist breakfast: some ham, a few croissants, a conbini (convenience store) hot dog, a BOSS Coffee and a pint of milk. Rice-fed cows’ milk in Japan tastes like a bowl of Rice Chex cereal, unlike milk in the west. Contrary to popular perception in the west, you can eat pretty cheap in Japan, although it’s not optimally healthy.

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View of Shinjuku from the roof of Sunshine City. Just beyond, barely visible in the distance is the Landmark Tower in Yokohama 40 miles to the southwest.

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Inside Sunshine 60’s observatory – which affords spectacular views of Tokyo in all directions. Looking out the window shown here to the right provides a great view of Tokyo Sky Tree.

An epic panorama facing west. On the far right is Ikebukuro to the north, the tallest bldg. of which is Sunshine 60, and Shinjuku on the far left to the south. If you look closely, the farthest left bldg. on the main skyline is the NTT Docomo Yoyogi Building (Yoyogi is just south of Shinjuku). The large white object in the right center is Tokyo Dome to the east. You can walk to all 3 areas, but the distance from one to another is quite a hike and would take a couple of hours.

Tokyo Sky Tree lies 16 miles to the east near the Sumida River.

Phone map of Ikebukuro. The station is in the center.

Facing northeast. The station is out of view to the left (west). Turn right at the bottom of the photo for the main side street with shops. A Happy Pancake is just down a tiny alley next to the brown bldg. on the right side of the frame. The first Bic Camera Annex is just to the left of the alley. Yamada Denki is the large white bldg. on the far left of the frame. If you head down the side street to the right of the next bldg. you’ll find Coffee Valley. The older Mr. Donut is also down here. The small green-roofed object in the lower left corner is the entrance to the undergorund Ikebukuro Shopping Park (ISP).

The end of the side street on the east side. Head right (south) here to get to Sunshine City.

Another view of the Milky Way Café, left, facing south. Turn left here for Sunshine City and the main side street. Heading straight ahead to the south eventually brings you to Shinjuku.

YA view of the Milky Way Café.

Just left of the Mily Way Café facing north.

Tokyu Hands entrance just next to the Sunshine City Annex.

The ISP street entrance just east of the JR station.

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Entrance to another side street in Ikebukuro which runs north-south.

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Entrance to Yamada Denki, on the east side. The small yellow boxes are Gatchapon dispensers – which sell very popular small toys.

A large NAMCO arcade.

Another view of Q plaza.

Hidin’ on the backstreets.

Courtesy Tokyo Night Walker

Looking back west from the east end of the long side street. The station is straight ahead. The entrance to Tokyu Hands and Sunshine City is on the left.

Courtesy Tokyo Night Walker

If you turn left (south) at the previous photo you’ll come upon K-BOOKS book + game stores. Sunshine 60‘s main complex is down a few blocks on the left. If you head further down, across the street from Sunshine 60 on the corner, you’ll find a great cheap coin locker on the corner:

Courtesy Tokyo Night Walker

Goodies @ The Milky Way Café.

LINKS

http://www.city.toshima.lg.jp/340/shisetsu/koen/029.html

JR Ikebukuro Station

Seibu Ikebukuro Line

https://www.jreast.co.jp/e/customer_support/service_center_ikebukuro.html

https://www.jreast.co.jp/e/pass/suica.html

JR Sightseeing Map

Google Map

https://mapcarta.com/16069282

https://livejapan.com/en/in-tokyo/in-pref-tokyo/in-ikebukuro/article-a0000723/

https://www.jrailpass.com/blog/ikebukuro-station

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ikebukuro_Station

JR Yamanote Line for Harajuku, Shibuya, Shinagawa, Tokyo, Akihabara, Ueno & Ikebukuro

Ikebukuro | Tokyo Travel Guide

What’s New in Ikebukuro This Month: August 2021

SEIBU Ikebukuro Station map

Ikebukuro Station | Tokyo Creative Travel

Essential Tokyo: Complete Ikebukuro Station

Ikebukuro Station: Complete Beginner’s Guide to Cracking This 3D Maze

Narita to Ikebukuro: Best Transport Options | Tokyo Cheapo

Coin Lockers @ Ikebukuro Station

Ikebukuro Station Area Guide: Top 15 Spots When You Escape the Station’s Maze! | LIVE JAPAN travel guide

Awesome Things to Do In Japan: Most Popular Spots in Ikebukuro! (January 2020 Ranking) | LIVE JAPAN travel guide

https://www.japanvisitor.com/japan-city-guides/japan-stations/ikebukuro-station

Ikebukuro | A funky, high-energy northern Tokyo neighborhood built to entertain

Tokyo Travel: Ikebukuro

Ikebukuro Guide @ Best Japan

https://www.japan-guide.com/e/e3038.html

Shops / Services | Sunshine City

Sunshine 60 – Skyscraper Center

Sunshine 60: Tokyo’s Haunted Skyscraper

Book the rooftop of Sunshine 60

Coffee Valley Ikebukuro

Coffee Valley

COFFEE VALLEY @ [Good Coffee]

Esola Complex Ikebukuro

LUMINE Ikebukuro Food Court

Q plaza Ikebukuro

Ikebukuro Underground

Darcy’s Beer + Burger Ikebukuro

A Happy Pancake – Ikebukuro Edition

Rainbow Pancake

Japan’s Massive Depato Food Courts

Press Butter Sand

http://www.web-isp.co.jp.e.qf.hp.transer.com/

Ikebukuro West Gate Park (TV series) – Wikipedia

https://nekobukuro.com/

VIDS

This vid by View Japan gives a great lay of the land in Ikebukuro.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OKnX1HSvnwo
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OKnX1HSvnwo

Tokyo Pancake Superguide

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A pancake craze has hit Tokyo.

There are awesome pancake shops all over the city. Many of them are quite good – must visits. Some of these places are pretty crazy – offering stacks of 8-12 pancakes with scoops of ice cream, chocolate, honey, fruit, eggs, and whipped cream.

In the battle for king of the Tokyo pancake houses, there are two top contenders: Flipper’s and A Happy Pancake. Both are out of this world. Flipper’s seems to be the obvious winner – with a huge place in Harajuku (shown below), and one in Shibuya as well. There are others. A Happy Pancake also has one in Harajuku, as well as a slightly smaller one in Ikebukuro. (There are 5 A Happy Pancake‘s total – Omotosando, Shibuya, Ginza, Ikebukuro, Kichijoji).

See our post on A Happy Pancake Ikebukuro for a full review.

There is also a Flipper’s in S. Korea + a new one in New York City now. Flipper’s also has a small stand shop at Newoman @ Shinjuku Station.

After those 2 reigning kings, next on the list are j.s. Pancake Café (several all over Tokyo), and Rainbow Pancake in Ikebukuro.

Other’s include Bank’s Cafe Shibuya, bill’s Omotosando, and gram Harajuku (see below). All are excellent.

Flipper’s Harajuku/Omotosando. There is also one in Ebisu/Daikanyama. Expect a line most times. It’s that good.

Gomaya Kuki Harajuku

Another popular pancake shop in Harajuku is Gomaya Kuki. This shop is world-famous for its pancakes served with ice-cream and sesame + matcha parfait. Along with Flipper’s a must try if you are in Harajuku. If you plan to hit both shops at the same time, you may want to walk 15 miles or so first sightseeing so you’ll be really hungry.

gram Harajuku

gram Harajuku is a smaller out-of-the-way pancake shop in Harajuku. A very nice shop with seating for about 30, they serve fluffy pancakes with fruit and syrup. Very nice. There are, in fact, several of them all over Tokyo and Japan as well as overseas. See their website for a complete list.

NOA Coffee Harajuku

NOA Coffee in Harajuku has a nice selection of waffles which are well worth a try. The cafe is just inside Takeshita St. on the right as you enter the street. Take the JR Yamanote Line or Chiyoda Line on Fukutoshin Line on the Tokyo Metro to the Meiji-jingumae <Harajuku> Station and exit to the north to find the entrance to Takeshita St.

Cafe Plant’s Odakyu @ Shinjuku Station

In the Odakyu department store (i.e. depato) next to Shinjuku Station there’s a cafe called Cafe Plant’s which serves great pancakes. Worth a look. To get here, get off at JR Shinjuku Station and head up to Odakyu on the northwest side.

Clover Ebisu

Also in Ebisu is Clover’s – a definite must-see. Northwest of Ebisu Station, Clover’s has a wide menu with lots of luxurious choices. You can’t go wrong here – but come ready to eat. And we mean eat.

R.L. Waffle Café @ Tokyo Station

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At the east side of Tokyo Station is the R.L. Waffle Café – well worth a visit. The blackberry ice cream variant shown above is out of this world. Head out the Yaesu Central Exit, head south along the sidewalk, and it’s the last shop on the right. There is also one in Akihabara. They even have matcha waffles.

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Head south along the Yaesu (east) side of Tokyo Station. Both R.L. Waffle Café and Volputas are down on the right.

N2 Brunch Club

N2 Brunch Club is a great little restaurant just east of Tokyo Station a few blocks. They serve pancakes + a variety of other food including ice cream + gelato. See our other article on how to get there.

Volputas @ Tokyo Station

Also at Tokyo Station – on the outdoor east floor just above R.L. Waffe Café is Volputas Pancake Dessert Café. Serving mostly stacks of pancakes with heaping piles of fruit, it’s well worth a stop. Prices are fairly reaonable. Expect to pay 1200¥ ($12-17). They also have smaller plain stacks for around $8.

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Sarabeth’s @ Tokyo Station

At the opposite end of Tokyo Station on the east side is Sarabeth’s. It’s just to the north of the massive Daimaru department store and south of the $400/night Shangri-La Hotel. The menu is excellent, but be prepared to spend a bit more – up to $30/person. Well worth it, however, once in a while.

The massive Daimaru food palace at the northeast end of Tokyo Station. Sarabeth’s is just out of frame to the right. Daimaru also has an awesome depachika (food basement).

KYOBASHI SEMBIKIYA fruit parlor @ Daimaru

On the 3rd floor of the Daimaru food palace next to Tokyo Station is the KYOBASHI SEMBIKIYA fruit parlor. While mostly fruits and sundaes, they also have waffles. Worth a look.

CAFE EIKOKUYA @ Daimaru

Also @ Daimaru on the 7th floor is the CAFE EIKOKUYA.

Rainbow Pancake Ikebukuro

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Rainbow Pancake in a mall in Ikebukuro. Well worth a stop. There is also one in Shibuya. To get to Rainbow Pancake, get to Ikebukuro Station, enter the SEIBU department store from inside the station, or the street, and head up to the top floor. There is also one in Omotosando.

Sanrio Cafe @ Sunshine City

In the basement of Sunshine City is the newly opened Sanrio Cafe where “You can enjoy pancake sets for 1,000¥ decorated in themes based on Hello Kitty, My Melody, Cinnamoroll and Pompompurin” as well as hamburgers, donuts, and a slew of other delights.

Leis’ Hawaiian Pancake + Coffee Ueno

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Just across from Ueno Station to the west is Leis’ Hawaiian Pancake + Coffee – a must-see. It’s on the 2nd floor of the Marui Bldg. (OIOI). As a footnote, there is also a Seria 100¥ store and a Ueno Tourist Info office in this bldg. also.

Kirby Cafe @ Tokyo Sky Tree

Courtesy Totally Drew

In the small town of Oshiagé is Tokyo Sky Tree and on the upper deck in the “East Yard” of the Solamachi complex is the Kirby Café. This shop sells delightful themed pancakes and is well worth a stop.

j.s. Pancake Café Nakano

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Over in Nakano west of Shinjuku is the j.s. Pancake Café – a bit out of the way, but huge + well worth it. There are 12 of these all over Japan.

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MOKUOLA Dexee Diner, Ikebukuro LUMINE

On the top floor of the LUMINE department store in Ikebukuro is a great pancake place called Mokuola Dexee Diner. They also have great hamburgers. You can get a variety of pancake plates for around $8-$10. The chcolate ones are fabulous. Other options include fruit, whipped cream, and matcha.

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LUMINE Ikebukuro just south of the station on the West Gate Park side. Head to the top floor.

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Head up to the Specialty Dining Floor.

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MOKUOLA Dexee Diner Get ready for some unbelievable pancake plates.

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They also have souffle + ice cream desserts.

Milky Way Café Ikebukuro

On the other (east) side of Ikebukuro Station to the southwest is the Milky Way Café. It’s on the 1st floor in the bldg. shown below just across from a major intersection. While Milky Way is mostly an ice cream parlour, they also have pancakes.

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Milky Way, Ikebukuro.

Shibuya

In Shibuya are Micasadeco & Cafe and Burn Side Café. Both are excellent. Micasadeco are known for their big stack of Ricotta chese pancakes served with whipped cream. Burn Side Cafe has a wide menu with chocolate pancakes, fruit, and pancakes served with ice cream. Come hungry.

Benitsuru (formerly “Flamingo Café”)

In Shibuya is a great new cafe called Benitsuru (Pink Crane). Formerly known as Flamingo Café, the place has been remodeled + updated. Reservations are required. You need to go to the shop, make a reservation + deposit 2000¥ ($20) for a reservation. Seating is limited. They serve a huge stack of fluffy pancakes with egss and bacon. Not to be missed. Paolo From Tokyo has a video about the place (see below). There is also a Benitsuru in Ueno.

Also in Shibuya is the Jimmy Monkey Café. Serving pancakes + light French Toast, they also serve ice cream, burgers, and coffee. Worth looking in.

IVY PLACE

Also in Shibuya is Ivy Place, with a nice upscale atmosphere, and plenty of seating. You can see their menu here.

Milk

Milk “Craft Cream” is a small shop specializing in fluffy pancakes and pastries in Shibuya. Worth a look.

Cafe Asan, Ueno

In Ueno, in Tokyo’s northeast is Cafe Asan. It’s in a little art space called 2K540 hidden under the freeway north of Akihabara Station. Well worth a trip on foot – it’s only a mile or so. They are closed Tuesdays. Cafe Asan has unusal hammock-style seating which makes it more interesting, if not a little unusual for a restaurant. Still worth a look. They have giant fluffy pancakes and souffles with heaping servings of fruit + a mountain of whipped cream. 2k540 is roughly located at 35°42’10.66″ N 139°46’25.45″ E.

Ginza

A small shop on a side street in Ginza, Yukinoshita is well worth a stop. Featuring smaller, refined plates of fluffy pancakes + french toast, it’s worth a look.

bill’s Ginza

Also in Ginza is the great bill’s – a must-see. They have a nice modern environment, and a wide menu with lots to chose from. They also serve a variety of wine + coffee. There’s a review of bill’s @ the Pancake Club Blog.

eggs n’ things Ginza

eggs n. things “Breakfast from Hawaii” in Ginza is also worth a look – with a Hawaiian theme it’s an enjoyable experience. They serve big plates of pancakes with heaping piles of whipped cream + fruit. They also serve burgers and a variety of drinks. Worth a stop. There’s also a review over @ the Pancake Club Blog in Japanese only.

French Toast Factory, Akihabara

In Yodobashii Akihabara, on the food floor, you’ll find the French Toast Factory. Well worth a visit for the light yet thick French Toast served here. To get there, take a train to JR Akihabara Station, and exit northeast.

Flying Scotsman, Akihabara (フライング・スコッツマン 秋葉原)

Just to the northwest of the Akihabara UDX Bldg. down a little side street is Flying Scotsman pancake shop. It’s a small shop with limited seating but is well worth the trip. To get there exit the JR Akihabara Station Electric Town (North) Exit and head northwest up the next side street north to the west of the UDX Bldg. It’s down a side street on the left roughly around 35°41’59.81″ N 139°46’19.92″ E.

Café Hudson @ Shinjuku Mylord

In the Shinjuku Mylord bldg. next to Shinjuku Station is Café Hudson – a nice indoor pancake and coffee shop. There is lots of seating and a vast menu of variety to chose from. And it’s really easy to get to – take a JR or subway line to Shinjuku Station, and exit the new remodeled north entrance and head west. The Mylord bldg. is just at the west end of the station. You can also get to it from the Southern Terrace. The cafe is smoke-free, but note they don’t have free WiFi. Still worth a look however – a very nice place to eat. It’s on the 9th floor.

French Toast LONCAFE Meguro

French Toast LONCAFE in Meguro is a small shop that serves great French Toast and champaign. There is a shop in Meguro and one in Shinjuku as well. Both worth a look.

Just under Meguro Station sneak up on the LONCAFE and you won’t be disappointed.

Butter Pancake @ PARCO Kinshicho

In the town of Kinshicho in the PARCO department store is a nice pancake shop called simply Butter which serves stacks of a dozen pancakes with fruit, whipped cream, and other goodies:

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©2019-2020 tenmintokyo.com

Rakeru @ OIOI Kinshicho

Also in the OIOI bldg. is Rakeru. While not particularly high-end, this quaint western-style restaurant serves a variety of pancake plates with fruit, ice cream, whipped cream, and other toppings. Prices range from $6-$18. Not a bad little shop.

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©2019-2020 tenmintokyo.com

Pinnochio Itabashi

Just north of Ikebukuro in the small town of Itabashi is the Pinnochio Coffee Shop. This shop is well-known in the area for its great pancakes. To get there, walk northwest of Ikebukuro on the Central Circular Route, on the west side of the street, and hang a left around 35°44’41.50″ N 139°42’28.77″ E down a side street. To get to Central Circular Route from Ikebukuro Station, you’ll have to wander northwest on side streets for .65 miles. The east way is to get onto Rt. 315 west + head northwest, then turn right. The entire walk from the station is only a few miles and isn’t that hard.

Rt. 315 NW out of Ikebukuro heading towards Pinnochio. Take a right at the next major intersection to get to the Central Circular Route.

The massive Central Circular Route in Itabashi. Hang a left here.

Pinnochio Coffee Shop, Itabashi.

Roppongi

Incredibly, the Snoopy Museum of Tokyo also has a Snoopy Pancake Breakfast – if you’re in Roppongi, be sure to check it out.

egg Café Kokubunji

About 14 miles to the west of central Tokyo is egg Café Kokubunji. While their menu selection is a bit limited, their pancake meals are out of sight + are well worth a trip if you have time. It’s located on a little side street at 35°42’08.60″ N 139°28’51.85″ E.

Chaka @ Kita-Sensju Station

In the far north part of Tokyo, near Kita-Sensju Station is Chaka, a small pancake shop which serves fluffy pancakes + fruit as well as bacon + eggs pancakes. To get here take the Hibiya or Chiyoda Metro Subway line to Kita-Sensju Station. Chaka is near the station on Kyu Nikko Kaido St. Chaka requires a reservation from their site.

3 Stars Pancake Kawasaki

To the southwest of Tokyo in Kawasaki is 3 Stars Pancake. A bit of a hike just for a pancake shop but if you’re in the area, worth a stop.

VERY FANCY loves ANNTEANA Daikanyama

A very slick shop in Daikanyama is VERY FANCY loves ANNTEANA. Just south of Shinjuku on a little side street in a small residential neighboorhood, this shop is worth a stop. They also have a cookbook and special Halloween Menu.

〒064-0808 北海道札幌市中央区南8条西3-1-4 HOTEL RELIEF 札幌すすきの 1F
TEL : 011-520-6560
BREAKFAST 07:00-10:00
CAFE TIME 11:00-19:00(L.O.18:30)
不定休

Denny’s

Oddly, unlike their counterparts in the US, most Denny’s in Japan are lacking in the breakfast area. Most Japan Denny’s are more lunch-oriented. They do have breakfast, but they are much less impressive + generally smaller than in the US – for pancakes in Japan, really not worth it.

Walk It Off

Don’t worry about gaining weight when you pig out on pancakes in Tokyo. You’ll most likely walk 10-15 miles a day as a tourist when there so you won’t gain weight. In fact, it’s not uncommon to see tiny Japanese women in pancake palaces in Tokyo wolfing down huge plates of pancakes with ice cream. The daily walking routine in Tokyo means most of the calories are burned off in less than a day. Which means you can enjoy eating even more.

Conclusion

Well, that’s it for now. We’ve only scratched the surface here. There are many more pancake shops in Tokyo worth checking out. We’ll keep this page updated if we come across any new cool pancake houses in Tokyo.

Finally, for the most insane comprehensive OTT catalog of pancake places in Tokyo check out the TCS Pancake Club website. This unbelievable site has a review of literally 1000’s of Tokyo pancake shops. It’s so comprehensive it’s hard to imagine how the 2 ladies who run it found the time to compile the list (with photos and descriptions in Japanese only, unfortunately – they’ve been at it for 10 years). Quite an impressive list.

Enjoy!

LINKS

http://blog.livedoor.com/10th/history/tcspancake

Happy Pancake Ikebukuro

https://www.rl-waffle.co.jp/en/

Rainbow Pancake Shinjuku

http://cafeasan.jp/

Café Asan Ueno

https://www.gotokyo.org/en/spot/240/index.html

gram café Harajuku

NOA Coffee Harajuku

https://www.gram-inc.com/

https://billsjapan.com/jp

Burn Side St Cafe Shibuya

Ivy Place Shibuya

https://kirbycafe.jp/

http://tacchans.blog.jp/archives/83433992.html

Flying Scottsman Akihabara/Okachimachi

https://www.bankscafe.jp/menu

https://www.odakyu-sc.com/shinjuku-mylord/shop/list/?id=960

Pinokio, Itabashi

https://www.eggg.jp/cafe_kbj_about.html

http://www.french-toast-factory.jp/

https://monkeycafe.jp/main/cafe/index.html

http://japanshopping.org/archives/shop/34

https://veryfancy.me/daikanyama

Best fluffy pancakes in Tokyo

https://snoopymuseum.tokyo/s/smt/page/english?ima=0000

Best Places To Try The Famous Japanese Fluffy Pancakes In Tokyo!

Steamed bun pancakes are this year’s must-try sweet

Tokyo’s Best Fluffy Pancakes

5 Cafes with the Fluffiest Japanese Pancakes in Tokyo

https://www.tsunagujapan.com/12-best-pancakes-in-tokyo/

Where to Eat Fluffy Japanese Pancakes in Tokyo

Japanese Chain Flipper’s Pillowy Pancakes Delight

Why Is Tokyo Crazy About Pancakes?!

We visit a Japanese cafe famous for John Lennon and epic pancakes

https://www.insider.com/fluffy-japanese-pancakes-new-york-worth-wait-2019-10

https://www.japan-experience.com/to-know/chopsticks-at-the-ready/japanese-pancakes

https://cafegeekjpn.blogspot.com/2016/12/jingumae-rainbow-pancake.html

https://japantoday.com/category/features/food/pancake-cafe-from-fukuoka-comes-to-tokyo

https://gurunavi.com/en/g135126/rst/?ngt=TT11010bb51005ac1e4ae6a0EnpUUWcEUMgS_9L054xGTD

https://gigazine.net/gsc_news/en/20201015-komeda-shironoir-kumamoto-mont-blanc/

https://favy-jp.com/topics/2525

https://bit.ly/3lSeZeJ

https://bit.ly/3jSpXPw

http://rakeru.jp/

https://www.timeout.com/tokyo/restaurants/pinocchio

https://sharing-kyoto.com/Blog/b_pancakes-in-kyoto

my Cafe & Foodie Journey in Japan

5 Best Pancakes in Akihabara

Encyclopedia of Pancakes: Tokyo Edition

http://tacchans.blog.jp/ (Japanese Only)

https://www.seria-group.com/shop/detail.html?code=000002195

VIDS

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pmbh_FqmNHc

A Happy Pancake – Ikebukuro Edition

Possibly the best pancake restaurants in Japan are A Happy Pancake chain of restaurants (aka “Shiawase no Pancake” – literally Pancake Happiness).

There are several all over Japan but the 2 most impressive ones are in Omotesando + Ikebukuro. There is also one in Shinjuku. The one in Omotosando/Harajuku is the newest, cleanest, and biggest of them all, but the others are just as worth checking out.

To find the one in Ikebukuro, exist the Seibu east exit from JR Ikebukuro Station + head south. A few blocks down, turn right, then turn left down the 1st alley (see map below). You can also use GPS on smart phones + simply type the name in – your smartphone should show you a map, the Happy Pancake location, and your direction relative to it. It’s one block southwest of the Baskin Robbins, also shown @ the bottom of this map:

The alleyway looks like this and at the far end is the entrance which leads back out to a street on the southeast side of JR Ikebukuro Station:

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©2019 tenmintokyo.com

A Happy Pancake is 2/3 down the alley on the left – and is in the basement shown here.

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Prices range from $8-$15. Lots of great combinations.

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To get seated enter the number of adults + kids at this machine, then press OK – you’ll be give a ticket with a number on it. You can also scan the QR code onto your smartphone.

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©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Be careful on the treacherous stairs – yikes! – which have no railing!

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©2019 tenmintokyo.com

Wait outside the door to be seated.

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Enjoy!

LINKS

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=a+happy+pancake+ikebukero&t=ffab&ia=web

VIDS

Harajuku + Omotesando Superguide

Name: Harajuku + Omotesando

Kind: Town

Location: 35°40’11.89″ N 139°42’32.43″ E

Our Rating: ⭑⭑⭑⭑⭑

Free WiFi? Yes.

Worth it? Do not miss it.

Updated 6/26/2021

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Page takes time to load due to photos.

Harajuku + Omotesando are 2 famous co-joined areas in west central Tokyo. Both spots are popular among young people + tourists.

Just to the east is Aoyama.

Harajuku is most famous for its shopping street – Takeshita Street. Omotesando Blvd. is runs parallel just to the south and is much bigger with more upscale shops + eateries.

Just to the north is Yoyogi and just to the south is Shibuya. Harajuku Station is on the JR Yamanote Line on the west side of Tokyo. A brand new larger JR station was completed in late 2019 to replace the historic aging older wooden station, which is now much too small for the tourist load. The new station is just south of the old one in the same block.

Just to the west of the station is Yoyogi National Gymnasium and Yoyogi Park – one of the most popular parks in Tokyo – and well worth a stop in spring, summer, and fall.

To get here, take any JR line that changes with the JR Yamanote Line, and get off at Harajuku Station. As a footnote, there is 1 other Metro station – Omoto-sando Station, all the way on the east side of Omotesando. You can traverse Omotesando Blvd. in a flash by shuttling between these 2 stations if you take the Chiyoda Line.

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Old Harajuku JR Station in late autumn 2019. The new station is on the left. Turn left from this vantage point at the next corner to enter Omotesando Blvd. Takeshita Street is to the right in this photo, out of frame. The old station was torn down in 2021.

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Old Harajuku JR Station exit. The new station is to the right. Takeshita Street is straight ahead. This exit is shown in the photo above under the clock. Far too small for today’s tourist traffic load, the brand new station just to the southwest replaced it. The old station was demolished and is no more.

Harajuku Station 200321a2.jpg
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Newly completed Harajuku Station on the JR Line. The old station is just to the right, out of frame and is scheduled to be torn down soon.

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East side Omoto-sando Station exit @ east end of Omotesando Blvd. You can take the Chiyoda, Ginza, or Hanzomon Lines. The JR Station is straight ahead a few miles. An interesting footnote is you can get from one side of Omotesando Blvd to the other fast by taking the Chiyoda Line between this station and Meiji-jingumae <Harajuku> Station.

After you exit Harajuku Station, you can either turn left, and be at the entrance to Takeshita Street, or you can head right (south) and end up at a large intersection. If you head east from the intersection, you’ll be heading down Omotesando Blvd – which is the main shopping and restaurant street in the area.

Takeshita Street is shorter and takes less time, but is also much more crowded since it is smaller and more popular. Takeshita Street is mainly known for its several Crepé shops – including the famous Marion Crepés which was founded in 1976. There is also another Marion Crepés in the backstreets of Akihabara. There are also lots of clothing stores, restaurants, other food places, oddity shops, a DAISO 100¥ shop, and a small Bic Camera annex.

There are also a few hidden gems if you’re willing to venture down a few side streets for an off-the-beaten-path adventure. We’ll cover a few of those later.

Takeshita Street

The entrance to Takeshita Street is located at 35°40’17.76″ N 139°42’10.93″ E right across from the entrance of the old Harajuku Station. Head east down the street.

It’s usually pretty packed – especially on nights + weekends. You’ll have to jostle with lots of other people. Just after the entrance on the right is a small alley with lots of T-shirt shops (see Totally Drew‘s video below). Just past that not too far down on the right is the very good NOA Coffee – well worth a stop. Marion Crepés is about 1/2 way down on the left. Oddly, NOA Coffee is run by the NOAH Company which also runs sound + dance studios and boxing gyms all over Tokyo.

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The old harajuku Station exit just across from the entrance to Takeshita Street, which was demolished in 2021 after the new station opened.

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Entrance to Takeshita Street. There is an excellent Hoshino’s Coffee just to the left under the sign over the entrance. There is also a Family Mart.

Entrance to Takeshita Street at night.

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Giant crepé menu on Takeshita Street. Around $5-$7 each.

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Angel Crepés shop.

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Angel Crepés. You can eat yourself silly at these places. But after walking 10-15 miles a day, you’ll want to.

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World-famous Marion Crepés.

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Bic Camera Select annex on Takeshita Street. Just to the right is a Daiso 100¥ store.

About 1/2 way down Takeshita Street on the right, you’ll find a small side street that heads up a hill. Head up this street to the end – past several shops and boutiques, and then head left as the street curves around. Wander down a bit futher and at the end you’ll find the Depla Pol Chocolatier. This fabulous place has all kinds of goodies and waffles to boot. It’s only open from 10:00 AM to 8PM but well worth it. Its located at approximately 35°40’15.61″ N 139°42’14.89″ E. But because it’s off the beaten path, there is almost never a line and you can usually get right in.

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Head left at this bldg.

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Entrance to Depla Pol Chocolatier.

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©2019 tenmintokyo.com

There is also an excellent bar/restaurant hidden back on this street.

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Along this street is an amusingly named beer/coffee shop called Farms – by Good Munchies.

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A stroll down Takeshita St. This is facing back towards the street entrance to the west.

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Just south of JR Harajuku Station. The new station bldg. is on the left. The tall NTT HQ bldg. (also known as the “bubble building”) is in the center off in the distance in Shinjuku to the north. To the right is Omotesando Blvd.

Coin Lockers

Just down on the right past the entrance to Takeshita St is a small luggage storage locker shop. If you need to store your luggage for the day, you can drop your stuff here, and retrieve them on your way out. Rates range from 400¥-800¥ and you can store items for up to 4 days. The shop has 24/7 video surveillance of all lockers so your stuff is secure. Oddly, this shop is run by the NOAH Company, which also runs the NOA Coffee shop just down the street.

Omotesando Blvd.

Omotesando Blvd. entrance east of Harajuku Station. The Omotesando Hills shopping center is on the left.

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Heading east down Omotesando Blvd.


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Further down Omotesando Blvd. on the left side is a MOS Burger Café.


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There is also a Tokyu Plaza with an open-air garden on top.


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Apple Store on Omotesando Blvd.


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Plenty of nice restaurants along Omotesando Blvd.


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Omotesando Blvd. facing east.


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A side street off Omotesando Blvd.


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Another side street.

If you head down Omotesando Blvd, past the first major intersection, at around 35°40’04.35″ N 139°42’24.64″ E on the right across from the Ralph Lauren Flagship Store, you’ll see a side street. If you turn right here and head up the street, just on your right you’ll come to the best pancake shop in Harajuku: Flippers. This place is so good there is usually a line. The pancake craze has hit Tokyo and this is one of the best pancake shops in the city. Be prepared to wait and pay a few dollars to pig out on pancakes + fruit. But be careful – you can eat yourself sick in this place if you overdo it.

Flipper’s pancake shop in Omotesando.

There is another, competing pancake shop called A Happy Pancake (Shiawase no Pancake – literally Pancake Happiness) in Omotesando worth checking out. See our review of the one in Ikebukuro for links + more info.

There are all kinds of additional shops down side streets. It’s well worth it to wander down some of these streets to see what’s there. There is even a TinTin store tucked back on the south side of Omotesando Blvd. If you arrive early enough, you can easily walk all of Harajuku + Omotesando in a day. Try to avoid weekends and nights because that is when the area is packed with crowds of tourists.

If you walk all the way down Omotesando Blvd. about .7 miles, you’ll come to Rt. 413. If you head left (north) here, you’ll find all kinds of interesting stuff. There’s a great upscale noodle restaurant called Miyota. There’s also an Olympic bicycle shop which has some really nice bikes at reasonable prices. There’s an elegant upscale furniture store called Modern Works, and a few small drink spots: Beer Brain in a small wood shack on a trailer, and Stockholm – a small café with a tiny rooftop porch. All worth checking out


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Miyota in Omotesando.


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Beer Brain in east Omotesando.


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Stockholm Roast in east Omotesando.

Meiji Jingu Shrine

Back behind the new Harajuku Station to the west is Meiji Jingu Shrine. This is one of the most famous and popular shrines in all of Tokyo. It’s surrounded by a huge park with spectacular gardens. Well worth a look. To reach the entrance, just exit the station, then head over the small bridge behind it and to the right.

Just to the southwest of Meiji Jingu Shrine is Yoyogi Park – also well worth a visit – and it’s free. There ‘s a small pond inside, lots of walking paths, and large grass areas to sit in. It’s a popular spot for picnics among locals in spring and fall. To reach it, head south (left) from the entrance to Meiji Jingu Shrine just for a few steps, then turn right under the pedestrian overpass. It’s just a few yards down on the right.

In fact, you can walk the entire road encircling both parks in under an hour or two. Both are well worth a look.

A Few More Notables

There are a few other interesting spots to check out: Watari-um Museum, Nezu Museum, and The Awesome Store. See links below for more.

Cat Street

Back behind the main drag in Omotesando is a small quiet side street lined with shops called Cat Street. Well-lit and very interesting for a stroll. If you walk all the way north on this street you will eventually come out in Shibuya (See photos below).

Well, that’s it for Harajuku/Omotesando. Enjoy your trip – both are easy to access, and compact enough to see everything in a day. It’s one of Tokyo’s most intersting spots and well worth a look.

Additional Photos

Cat Street in Harajuku leading to Omotesando Blvd.

Cat Street in Harajuku leading to Omotesando Blvd. If you head back the other way and turn right where the street lights end, the road to the right will take you north to Shibuya eventually.

The old wood station being torn down in late 2020.

Co-working Spaces

In the new shopping complex across from the new Harajuku Station is a LIFORK shared work space. This space is brand new and excellent. It’s on the top floor next to the new IKEA. If you’re looking for cool shared office space, check it out. There is also a LIFORK in Akihabara.

Additional Photos

Entrance to Omotosano Blvd. across from the new JR Harajuku Station.

Meiji-Dori intersects Omotosando Blvd. near the new Q plaza bldg.

Looking north into Roppongi.

LINKS

https://www.jreast.co.jp/e/destinations/tokyo/index.html?src=gnavi

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harajuku_Station

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2020/01/29/national/new-harajuku-station-building-unveiled-march-opening/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harajuku

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omotesand%C5%8D

http://omotesando.or.jp/jp

http://omotesando.or.jp/en/shop_category

50 things to do in Harajuku

https://thosewhowandr.com/blog/things-to-do-harajuku

https://www.timeout.com/tokyo/things-to-do/50-things-to-do-in-harajuku

https://whereintokyo.com/venues/25094.html

http://www.ao-aoyama.com/

https://whenin.tokyo/Omotesando-Aoyama-Area-Guide

https://whenin.tokyo/Gyre-Omotesando

https://trulytokyo.com/omotesando/

https://trulytokyo.com/harajuku-and-aoyama/

Tokyo Travel Guide: Omotesando

http://japanshopping.org/

https://whereintokyo.com/venues/25094.html

https://favy-jp.com/topics/2559

https://t5pg.jp/shops/a009-011-003/

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g1066451-d8612608-Reviews-Sobakiri_Miyota-Minato_Tokyo_Tokyo_Prefecture_Kanto.html

http://tokyobelly.blogspot.com/2017/02/omotesando-soba-kiri-miyota-delicious.html

The jewel of the 1964 Olympics: Yoyogi National Stadium

http://www.poldepla.be/index.php?c=about&id=42

LIFORK Harajuku

http://www.tbb.works/

https://stockholmroast.jp/

https://www.reissue.co.jp/

Watari-um Museum

Nezu Museum

IKEA Harajuku – Shopping And Vegan-Friendly Swedish Delights

https://matcha-jp.com/en/15

https://www.japanvisitor.com/japan-temples-shrines/meiji-shrine

https://www.japan-guide.com/e/e3002.html

Harajuku Guide @ The Best Japan

Workingholiday Connection | Harajuku

Gomaya Kuki

Coconut Glen’s Coconut Ice Cream is a Must-Try in Omotesando

VIDS

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vsOBBA-hvfM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VAc8tM9Gz5I

Even murals in Japan are done with class.