Shinjuku Superguide

Name: Shinjuku

Kind: Town

Free Wifi: Yes

Location: 35°41’29.39″ N 139°42’07.68″ E

Station: Shinjuku Station – JR Yamanote Line

Our Rating: ⭑⭑⭑⭑⭑

Worth it? Don’t miss it.

Updated 8/9/2021

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

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The name Shinjuku means New Lodgings. The area became a busy commerce center during the Edo Period and later again after World War 2. The name derives from the older area Harajuku (Sun Lodgings) to the south.

A diorama depicting Shinjuku during the World War 2 era at the Edo-Tokyo Museum.

Access

Shinjuku Station

Shinjuku Station is the busiest train station on earth. Over 2 million people pass through the station every day. At rush hour the place is so packed it can be hard to move or even find your way around if you’re not familiar with it.

There are both Japan Rail (JR) platforms for common lines such as the Yamanote Line, as well as various subway lines. The station acts as an interchange + transfer point for many lines in Tokyo. There are at least 8 levels in the station, many of them buried deep underground.

There are also lots of shopping areas as well as a newly renovated outside shop area and courtyard (Shinjuku Southern Terrace). The station was vastly expanded in 2009-2010 and is now several times its former size on the south end.

Area Layout

The station is shown above, lower center. On both the north and south ends there are huge clusters of shopping centers, as well as an outdoor courtyard. To the northwest is the Cocoon building, and the Tokyo Metropolitain Gov’t buildings (which has a great free observation deck). Just northeast of the Cocoon Tower is the Odayku department store (depato) complex. To the northeast are the main streets with a dizzying array of outdoor shops, restaurants, and things to do and see. At night the area comes alive with lights + sounds – a photographer’s dream. There are also countless huge electronics shops such as Bic Camera and others.

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View of Shinjuku from the outdoor platform. The Mode Gakuen Cocoon Tower is on the left, and Odakyu (see below) is the orange building in the center. Ikebukuro is a few stops to the north from here.

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Info map at the station on a platform.

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From Shinjuku you can take your pick of 2 more interesting areas in either direction: Ikebukuro to the north, or Shibuya to the south.

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Madness at a station platform.

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At the north entrance of the station around 35°41’31.78″ N 139°42’03.26″ E is the famous Duckman street performer.

The surface-level of the station has several areas: the main (north) area bisected by Rt. 20 running east-west (this area has the LUMINE and NewWoman modifications made in the early 2000’s. The MyLord bldg. and open terrace to the west of that, the Cocoon bldg. area to the northwest, and the Takashimaya Square area to the south. Of course there are many more areas than this – the station area is huge and takes a whole hour to circumnavigate on foot. Just to the northeast of the LUMINE area is a huge OIOI (pronounced Marui) department store complex, and just to the immediate west on Rt. 20 is a huge Don Quijote discount store. Also at the very south end of the new station redevelopment is a huge outdoor open-air sitting area + cafés (Shinjuku Southern Terrace). You can sit and watch the trains come and go beneath you. Just to the east of the Takashimaya Square complex is the huge Shinjuku Gyoen National Garden – a must see. If you go to the gardens and have a few extra minutes, also pop in to Yoyogi just a few minutes’ walk to the south.

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Inside the crazy west end of the station.

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Heading down into the Metro Ginza line from the west side of the station.

Courtesy Virtual Japan.tv

The northwest terrace. The MyLord bldg. is straight ahead.

Tourist Info Offices + Currency Exchange + Coin Lockers

At the very south end of the LUMINE bldg. under the train tracks is a huge Shinjuku Tourist Information Office. If you want to pick up some brochures on things to do in the area, stop in when you first arrive.

The outdoor Tourist Info Office just under the tracks next to LUMINE.

There is another Tokyo Tourist Information Center on the 3rd floor near the south exit. There’s also a Sagawa luggage delivery service office here.

At the west exit there is the Odakyu Sightseeing Service Center which has all sorts of info about sightseeing.

There are also loads of currency exchanges around the info offices, but their rates may not be the best. You might be better off using a smaller exchange in places such as Akihabara, or the Sakura Exchange in Shibuya.

There’s also a large coin locker bank on the southern side of the info center shown above.

Seibu-Shinjuku Station

We should also mention that just to the north of the main Shinjuku Station a few blocks is the smaller Seibu-Shinjuku Station on the Seibu Shinjuku Line.

Flags Building + Green Peas Pachinko

Around 35°41’23.18″ N 139°42’05.80″ E is an east exit from the station, 2 long escaltors, and a huge department store called Flags. There’s a huge GAP that’s been here for over 20 years.

The Flags Building @ the east exit.

Incredibly, right next to the Flags building is a huge, 8-story pachinko parlor called Green Peas, which even has entire floors of Vegas-style slot machines. There is also a huge Taito Game Station arcade just behind it down a side street.

Courtesy Virtual Japan.tv

Green Peas Pachinko.

Odakyu Depato

Just northwest of the station is the Odakyu Depato (department store) area. There are plenty of things to do here, and there’s a food floor on the top floor, which includes Shinjuku’s part of the latest craze in Tokyo: pancakes. Rainbow Pancake is on the food floor. There are also elevated walkways to other department stores such as Keio just across the street (Keio‘s food basement is one of the best in Tokyo).

The dept. store complex on the west side. Odakyu is the orange bldg. on the right, and just to the right of that, the KEIO dept. store. Further to the left out of view is a huge Bic Camera. The Cocoon bldg. is just behind the camera to the west. The MyLord terrace area is just beind the KEIO bldg. to the east. There are actually 2 Odakyu complexes – the east side one shown here, and the Odakyu/HALC/Bic Camera annex to the north (out of frame to the left). There is also a major bus stop area here.

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Rainbow Pancake on the top floor of Odakyu.

If you’re really into pancakes, also check out Sarabeth’s Lumine Shinjuku just inside the new LUMINE building on top of the station at street level on the north side.

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Giant pie-sized cookies in KEIO‘s food basement.

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Heading in to the east-side Odakyu complex (right). The northern Odakyu/HALC annex is shown here on the left. This photo faces north.

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Standing on the northern Odakyu/HALC annex pedestrian overpass facing east. The huge UNIQLO is on the right.

Central Streets

From the station to the east, there are 3 main streets running west-east which parallel each other a few blocks apart. These are: 1), Yasukuni-Dori 2), Shinjuku-Dori, and 3) Koshu-Kaido Dori (Rt. 20).

By far, the most popular of these is Yasukuni-Dori. Several blocks to the east Meiji-Dori intersects all 3 and runs north-south all the way to the Imperial Palace. In this central area of about 3-4 long blocks, most of the action in Shinjuku happens. The west side is interesting too, but it’s more business/gov’t-oriented. A stroll around the east-side streets at night will floor you with its colors, lights, and dizzing array of things to do.

North Exit + Studio ALTA

The northeast station exit is a popular meeting spot for young people. Just across the street is a building called Studio ALTA with its massive TV display on the outside of the building. If you slip down the small side street to the left at night, you’re in for one of Shinjuku’s nightime delights – a small concrete pedestrian-only area with lots of shops and restaurants. There is also a huge Matsumoto Kiyoshi drug store here, and the rear entrance to the huge Yamada Denki LABi electronics shop (see below). As mentioned above, this is also where the infamous Duckman performs nightly. If you head through the small concrete park, in a few blocks you’ll come to a huge Don Quijote, described next.

Studio ALTA, right. Head down the small side street ahead.

Just north of the north exit. The station entrance is ahead.

Massive Don Quijote on Yasukuni-Dori

On Yasukuni-Dori 2 blocks from the station is a huge Don Quijote discount store. If you’re strolling this street at night, it’s worth a stop in to look around. The place is huge and has multiple floors of just about anything you could want, including a grocery.

Courtesy Nippon Wandering TV

Dazzling streets of east Shinjuku at night.

Heading Further East to Shinjuku Ohdori Shopping District

As a footnote, you can walk or bike all the way east on Rt. 20 back to Yotsuya (about 6 miles) – there are a lot of interesting things to see along Rt. 20 as well as several other subway station stops at various points – most notably Shinjuku-Sanchome Station around 35°41’26.01″ N 139°42’20.84″ E, and Shinjuku-gyoemmae Station – one more stop the east. All of them pop up onto Rt. 20 at various points. The coolest thing about Shinjuku-gyoemmae Station is its little retro 1950’s-styled entrance on the street around 35°41’19.17″ N 139°42’35.28″ E. There is also a large, cheap, excellent APA Hotel just 1 block west on the same side of the street. There is also a huge Tully’s Coffee just across from Shinjuku-gyoemmae Station.

Heading east on Rt. 20 towards Yotsuya. Note the JTB building on the right. Along this route around this area there are also huge massive department stores such as Isetan, OIOI (pronounced Marui), and Takishimaya. This part of Shinjuku is known as the Shinjuku Ohdori Shopping District. There is also a huge Apple Store here. One of the best kept secrets in this area is the hobby shop on the top floor of the OIOI.

Mode Gakuen Cocoon Tower

West a few blocks from the west side of the station is the odd-looking Mode Gakuen Cocoon Tower. It’s mostly offices, but there are a few interesting things on the ground floor. It’s a rather small building, so there’s not a lot to do here. But it’s worth walking to it just to have a look at the architecture.

If you head just northwest from the Cocoon, you’ll come to an iconic part of Shinjuku which includes many buildings from famous photos of Tokyo: such as Sampo Japan Building, and others. There is also a massive pedestrian walkway here which allows you to walk around several of the buildings elevated from the streets.

There is also a very nice massive concrete and green park 2 blocks to the west of Cocoon at the Sojibo Shinjuku Mitsui Building around 35°41’30.14″ N 139°41’38.23″ E.

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Mode Gakuen Cocoon Tower northwest of the station. KEIO dept. store is behind the camera to the east. If you continue far enough west from here, you’ll come to the Tokyo Metropolitain Government complex which has one of the best observatories in Tokyo.

Mode Gakuen Cocoon Tower at street level facing east.

Outside Takashimaya Times Square. MyLord is the triangular bldg. center left, and beyond that, the Cocoon Bldg.

Tokyo Metropolitain Government

If you continue west for a few blocks, you’ll next pass the Shinjuku Keio Plaza Hotel, and 2 blocks west of that, you’ll come to the Tokyo Metropolitain Government buildings. These twin buildings house the entire central government for Tokyo. There is a massive open-air concrete courtyard surrounding the buildings, and a free observation deck on the top floors – but be warned, because it’s free, there are usually huge lines for the observatory – even on weekdays. Plan on spending several hours in line – more if it’s peak season such as in the spring or late fall.

Electronics (Denki)

The Japanese word for electronics is Denki. There are several huge electronics stores in Shinjuku: There are 2 Yamada Denki LABi stores – one near Studio ALTA mentioned above, and one just west of the MyLord building near the station’s central exit. The one near Studio ALTA is closing soon.

There are 3 huge Bic Camera stores – one in the Odakyu Annex mentioned above, one in the huge UNIQLO store (called BicQLO) around 35°41’29.45″ N 139°42’11.45″ E, and Bic Camera Shinjuku Station East Store just southeast of the Studio ALTA location.

The other big electronics store is the huge Yodobashi Camera Shinjuku West Main Store around 35°41’23.30″ N 139°41’52.96″ E. It’s just a few blocks southeast of the Cocoon Building. There’s also lots of interesting other small shops around the Yodobashi store.

All of the electronics shops are worth a look – if for no other reason than to marvel at their scale and selection.

Yodobashii Camera Shinjuku.

Mosaic Street

Jammed in between the MyLord + Keio Dept. Store bldgs. is the excellent Mosaic Street. Definitely worth a stop. We have a full post on it here.

Kinokuniya Book Store

Just across from the BicQLO store mentioned above is a huge Kinokuniya Book Store around 35°41’30.98″ N 139°42’09.99″ E. Kinokuniya is one of the largest book chains in Japan, and this one doesn’t disappoint. If you have any extra time, be sure to pop in and look around. They also have a web store where you can order online.

Takishimaya Times Square + The Bubble Building + Shinjuku Gyoen National Garden + Cafe La Boheme

Just to the south of the station and the Southern Terrace area is the epic Takashimaya Times Square complex – a huge multi-story shopping/food/entertainment complex, TTS is a must-see in Shinjuku. There are also plenty of interesting shops in the complex’s open-air below-ground area, and the large Tokyu Hands department store (depato) on the south side. To get to TTS, go outside to the southern terrace (on the west side of the station) and head south to the large foot bridges which lead to the complex.

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Takashimaya Times Square, left, and the NTT “Bubble building”, right.

Takashimaya Times Square at night.

Just south of TTS is the NTT DoCoMo “Bubble BuildingHQ. It was nicked-named the Bubble Building because it was built during Japan’s “bubble” economy in the late 1980’s-1990’s. The building’s design was inspired by the Empire State Building in Manhattan, New York.

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West of TTS is the Shinjuku Gyoen National Garden – a huge Japanese garden with several ponds, trees, and long walkways. Many of the paths afford excellent photo spots of various parts of Tokyo. There is also a large impressive greenhouse. Admission price is around $6 USD, but it’s worth it. Be sure to check it out.

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Entrance to Shinjuku Gyoen National Garden.

Cafe La Boheme

If you’re in the mood for a brew, just across the street to the north of the greenhouse is the excellent European-themed Cafe La Boheme at 35°41’15.14″ N 139°42’46.09″ E. If you love coffee + have the time, be sure to check it out – it’s excellent.

Shinjuku Historical Museum

If you’re willing to walk a few more miles northwest, around 35°41’23.90″ N 139°43’31.25″ E you’ll find the Shinjuku Historical Museum (see Totally Drew’s video below).

Courtesy Totally Drew

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J2ZCoVSVSnQ

Samurai Museum

To the north of the station a bit (oddly in a seedy nightclub area) around 35°41’43.84″ N 139°42’12.63″ E, is the excellent Samurai Museum Shinjuku. This is one of the best samurai museums in Tokyo, and you can even buy swords and take caligraphy lessons there if you want.

Walking to Other Parts of Tokyo from Shinjuku

As mentioned, you can actually walk to other parts of Tokyo (or ride a bike) such as Yotsuya or Akasaka. Ebisu is just to the south and worth a walk. Plan on a few hours, however, and the walk east is a quite a ways. On bike it will take about 30-45 minutes.

Yoyogi is just to the south also, and Nakano just to the northwest.

Food

There are so many food options in Shinjuku it’s hard to know where to start. The options are endless. There are conbini (convenience stores) in the station and they are all good. There are many good places just outside the station, and there are huge and upscale restaurants in the area and in TTS.

The Maple Diner waffle shop near the MyLord building.

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Kinokuniya Entreé conbini near the Saikyo Line in the station.

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HOKUO the Garden also in the station.

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Watch them carbs.

Shake Shack @ Southern Terrace.

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Soup Stock Tokyo.

Courtesy Virtual Japan.tv

American Bar + Grill, TGI Friday’s jammed down some side street.

More cool places hidden down side alleys.

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Food Hall BLAST! – 2 blocks west of TTS.

Sanagi Shinjuku Food Hall

http://sanagi.tokyo/

3 Food Halls Where You Can Casually Dine in Shinjuku – Shinjuku Guide

A Happy Pancake Shinjuku @ 35°41’26.01″ N 139°42’13.58″ E.

The world-famous Omoide Yokocho Alley around 35°41’33.97″ N 139°41’58.12″ E.

Taming The Beast

Shinjuku is one of the biggest, busiest, and most overwhelming parts of Tokyo – you could easily spend several days exploring it all and not see everything. It’s a must-see part of Tokyo, so plan on spending a few days at least seeing it.

Conclusion

We can’t recommend Shinjuku enough – and you absolutely can’t miss it if you’re in Tokyo. From the station area to vast electronics stores, depatos, the TMG + Cocoon buildings, and the streets, there is more than enough to do here. Be astounded, and be amazed.

Enjoy!

Additional Photos

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The fire trucks are coming up around the bend. You live, you learn. The NTT “Bubble Building” towers in the distance at dusk.

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A typical exit info sign in Shinjuku Station.

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Inside the Odakyu complex heading down into the station below.

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The Yamanote Line heading north for Ikebukuro and Omiya.

Facing the Odakyu/KEIO complex from the taxi stand @ the west side of the station.

Also @ the west side of the station.

At the LUMINE/NewWoman side of the renovations at street level.

The Odakyu Line cuts through the Shinjuku night.

Courtesy Nippon Wandering TV

One of many endless excellent restaurants on the backstreets.

There are endless things to discover on the streets of Shinjuku.

A hidden place to park your bike for free in a small underpass.

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Stumbling around Shinjuku’s streets in the dark, every once in a while the perfect photo opportunity hits you smack in the face.

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Or if you prefer – the B+W version.

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Inside Odakyu HALC. This ain’t Walmart.

Outside Odakyu HALC.

Inside Shinjuku Station near MyLord.

Epic view outside Shinjuku Station. LUMINE is on the left, and MyLord is just behind the camera on the left.

On Southern Terrace. MyLord is just ahead behind the trees. The huge bldg. on the left used to be Microsoft‘s Japan HQ.

LINKS

Shinjuku Station – Wikipedia

Shinjuku Station

Shōnan–Shinjuku Line – Wikipedia

Shinjuku Station Building Facilities

Seibu-Shinjuku Station

Shinjuku Guide

Odakyu Sightseeing Service Center

Sightseeing Without Baggage|Sagawa

Shinjuku Shopping Guide | The Official Tokyo Travel Guide, GO TOKYO

JTB USA

Shinjuku Area Overview – Shinjuku Station

Shinjuku Southern Terrace – Wikipedia

southernterrace.jp

TOKYO POCKET GUIDE

Tokyo Metropolitain Government

Keio Department Store, Shinjuku

Shinjuku Mylord – Shinjuku Guide

Shinjuku Marui Honkan (OIOI)

Hotels near Shinjuku Station

5 Must-Try Restaurants in Shinjuku Mylord

Shinjuku Gyoen National Garden

新宿御苑 Shinjuku-Gyoen | Cafe La Boheme

Quick Guide to Shinjuku’s Department Stores

Takashimaya Square

https://trulytokyo.com/takashimaya-times-square/

https://www.japan-talk.com/jt/new/takashimaya-shinjuku

https://tokyocheapo.com/place/takashimaya-times-square/

Sarabeth’s Lumine Shinjuku

Don Quijote

Don Quijote | Shopping in Shinjuku, Tokyo

Yoyogi

https://www.samuraimuseum.jp/

VIDS

The main area to the northeast. The huge Don Quijote store is shown in this thumbnail on the right.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kln6afdUpH4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Va5yljaIObE

Roppongi

Name: Roppongi

Kind: Town

Free Wifi: Yes

Location: 35°39’42.86″ N 139°43’46.28″ E

Station: Roppongi Station (H04), Hibiya Line

Our Rating: ⭑⭑⭑⭑⭑

Worth it? Don’t miss it.

Updated 4/24/2021

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

Roppongi is a lively nightlife area in Tokyo popular with expats. The main road through the town is called Roppongi Dori and runs east-west. Another road at the major intersection shown below running north-south is called Gaien Higashi Dori. Both streets are strollable and provide endless things to do + see.

The central intersection in Roppongi on Roppongi Dori facing west. There are streets to the north + south (Gaien Higashi Dori), as well as the Roppongi Hills tower complex in the distance. East behind the camera down a long hill is the central gov’t area of Akasaka.

Access

The easiest way to get to Roppongi is to get the Tokyo Metro Hibiya Line and get off at Roppongi Station (H04).

It is also just 1.5 miles on foot from Toranomon to the east or about the same distance from Nagatcho/Akasuka to the north.

The Hibiya Line can also shoot you quickly out to Ginza, Akihabara, and Ueno all in just a few minutes.

Area Layout

Roppongi area facing northeast. Roppongi Hills is in the lower left corner to the west, Akasaka is in the upper right corner. Roppongi Dori runs left to right (east-west), and the Imperial Guest House and gardens is in the upper left corner. In the far upper right corner is the western edge of the Imperial Palace. If you head further right out of frame, you’ll be in Hibiya and Marunouchi to the east.

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Looking back east on Roppongi Dori. A bike ride down this long hill can be thrilling, after which you will arrive in Akasaka to the east.

National Art Center

Just 2 blocks northwest of Roppongi is the National Art Center, Tokyo, which is huge.

Roppongi Dori + Side Streets

One of Roppongi‘s biggest charms are its endless back streets + side streets. It seems around every corner there is something new to discover. There are also quite a lot of good restaurants hidden away. You’ll need to do some web research before you go.

There are also lots of small art galleries, specialty shops, dessert, and sushi places on the backstreets. Your options are nearly endless. The best way to discover is to walk around.

Roppongi Hills

On the west side of Roppongi is the area’s biggest attraction: Roppongi Hills. Built several years back, the complex is the showplace of Roppongi. There’s a huge apartment/office complex, with a large shopping mall in the center + basement, as well as various other attached areas such as Roppongi Hat (see below), street-level dining, and 2 large condo complexes. You can walk to Roppongi Hills from any of the town’s streets. It’s well worth the time, so don’t miss it.

Entrance to Roppongi Hills.

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©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

Roppongi Hills high-rise condos ahead.

Observatory + Mori Art Museum

On the 3rd floor of Roppongi Hills is an entrance to the rooftop observatory (Tokyo City View) on the top floor as well as the Mori Art Museum (the complex was built by one of Japan’s biggest construction companies: Mori Construction).

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Entrance to Tokyo City View + Mori Art Museum.

Roppongi Hat

Right on the street next to Roppongi Hills is a large round glass bldg. called Roppongi Hat. Mostly food + entertainment, there are lots of options here. The 2-story basement has loads of food in a huge food court.

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Roppongi Hat.

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©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

Roppongi Dori looking west. Note the cheesy “bike lane”, which in Japan usually means nothing but a few symbols painted on the road.

Mohri Garden

Back behind Roppongi Hills is a hidden Japanese Gardern called Mohri Garden. You can stroll through the garden and enjoy the scenery. Fall is particularly spectacular.

Keyaki Hill + Illumination

Just west of the garden 1 block behind the TV Asahi building is a street named Keyaki Hill (Keyakizaka in Japanese) famous for its winter illumination with a direct view of Tokyo Tower in the distance. Keyaki is a Japanese hardwood used by artisans in Japan. The street is lined with these trees which makes for a spectacular winter light show during the cold months around Christmas/New Year’s. There is also a huge Tsutaya Books store just on the corner at the entrance to Keyaki Hill. The entrance to the street is around 35°39’33.28″ N 139°43’54.72″ E, although most people enter the street from the north end at night in order to get the direct view of Tokyo Tower in the distance.

Tokyo Midtown Roppongi + Suntory Museum of Art

Squirreled away and hidden just a block east of National Art Center, is Tokyo Midtown Roppongi. Like its counterpart in Hibiya to the east this Midtown complex has a lot to do + see. There’s a huge cinema, depatos (department stores), shops, a massive bakery, and lots of other stuff. There’s a huge central square with buildings on all sides. There are also hotels plus the Suntory Museum of Art (Suntory is a Japanese beverage company). If you’re in Roppongi, you won’t want to miss it.

For Book Lovers: Bunkitsu

Right on Roppongi Dori around 35°39’26.61″ N 139°44’37.12″ E is a really huge bookstore called Bunkitsu. If you’re into books, check it out.

A Few More Food Stops

Here’s a list of other potentially interesting food stops in Roppongi, but by all means, this list is not complete because Roppongi is full of hundreds of great food places.

ANTICO CAFFE AL AVIS ROPPONGI

Blue Bottle Coffee Roppongi

Bricolage Bread & Co

Dean & Deluca Roppongi

Gluten Free T’s Kitchen

Shirotae (in Akasaka)

Also check out Bistro Chick somewhere around 35°39’52.80″ N 139°43’48.87″ E.

Hotels + Hostels

Also in the Roppongi Hills complex is the fabulous, but very expensive Grand Hyatt Tokyo. Ultra-deluxe with hundreds of rooms, a stay will set you back several hundred dollars a night – in the off-peak season.

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A very nice + inexpensive option is the brand new Sotetsu Fresa Inn Tokyo-Roppongi around 35°39’39.91″ N 139°44’28.56″ E. Incredibly, off-season you can stay at this hotel as low as $29/night. It’s excellent. It also has a very nice lounge/café in the lobby.

As usual, APA hotels are a good option and the APA Hotel Roppongi SIX is excellent and is just up the street east from Sotetsu Fresa Inn. There is also another brand new APA hotel – APA Hotel Roppongi Eki-mae closer to Roppongi Hills around 35°39’44.11″ N 139°43’56.51″ E (“Eki-mae” means “At the station”). APA Hotels are always clean, cheap, quiet, and easy. You can’t go wrong.

A new gem built in 2020 right near the station + main intersection is remm Roppongi for around $70/night off-season, but it’s upscale + well worth it. There are a number of remm hotels all over Tokyo and they are all generally very good.

Comfort Inn Tokyo Roppongi is also a good cheap option around $40/night off-season.

A bit south of Sotetsu Fresa Inn around 35°39’42.91″ N 139°44’09.96″ E is another good option: Mitsui Garden Hotel Roppongi at around $80/night.

A bit north is the Hotel Asia Center of Japan which also has large conference facilities around 35°40’14.23″ N 139°43’40.70″ E.

Roppongi has a few nice hostels as well + they are fairly cheap, off-season.

The Wardrobe Hostel Roppongi is around $25/night + has a kitchen.

If you’re willing to stay a bit to the east in Akasaka, there’s a nice little family-run hostel called Inno Family Managed Hostel. Tucked down a little quiet side street around 35°40’20.15″ N 139°44’23.23″ E, it has bunks, but also unique rooms with several large queen beds for multiple guests. It’s very clean + provides showers, lockers, and a shared lounge/kitchen area for cooking. Distance to Roppongi Hills is only around 1 mile.

For a complete list of good deals check agoda.com.

Conclusion

Well that’s it for now. You can have hours of fun cruising the streets in Roppongi, exploring its backstreets, or checking out Roppongi Hills. It would be easy to spend a couple days here and not see it all. Well worth a stop.

Enjoy!

Additional Photos

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Inside Roppongi Hills.

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Sign for various attractions.

The man himself – Fukuyama Masaharu in an ad for a new dorama (TV series).

Courtesy Virtual Explore

The main intersection facing south. Roppongi Hills is to the right a few blocks. Akasaka is to the left.

Courtesy Virtual Explore

Facing south from the north area back towards the main intersection.

Courtesy Virtual Explore

Facing north on the street to the north of the main intersection. There’s lots to do here as well.

LINKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roppongi

Tokyo Travel: Roppongi

https://en.japantravel.com/tokyo/roppongi

Roppongi Hills

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attractions-g14129735-Activities-Roppongi_Minato_Tokyo_Tokyo_Prefecture_Kanto.html

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g1066451-d1373795-Reviews-Roppongi_District-Minato_Tokyo_Tokyo_Prefecture_Kanto.html

NATIONAL ART CENTER, TOKYO

Grand Hyatt Tokyo

APA Hotel Roppongi Eki-mae

remm ROPPONGI

Hotel Asia Center of Japan

Mori Art Museum

東京シティビュー – TOKYO CITY VIEW

Tokyo Midtown

Toranomon-hills Station/H06

What Is Japanese Keyaki Wood?

Cycle in Japan – Japan Travel

favy Japan

VIDS

Komagome

Name: Komagome

Kind: Town/City

Location: 35°44’11.87″ N 139°44’48.67″ E

Stations: Komagome Station/N14 Tokyo Metro Line, JR Komagome Station

Free Wifi: Yes

Our Rating: ⭑⭑⭑

Worth it? For a quick look, or on the way to Itabashi, Sugamo, or Tokyo Dome City.

Updated 2/19/21

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

Komagome is a small town in northwest Tokyo in between Tokyo Dome City to the south and Itabashi to the north. It’s on the JR Yamanote Line and Tokyo Metro Namboku Line. There’s not a lot to do in the town, but it’s interesting nonetheless. Perhaps the town’s most interesting feature is Rikugien Gardens (see below). The town also has a small lively nightlife backstreet area down a hill below the station away from the main part of the town. Its sister city Sugamo is just to the west.

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Access

To get to Komagome, take the JR Yamanote Line to Komagome Station, or take the Tokyo Metro Namboku Line. You can also walk or bike in just a few miles from a side street (see below) from Sugamo or Itabashi. From Tokyo Dome City also take the Namboku Line (it’s in the basement) from Korakuen Station 3 stops east to Komagome Station. On bike it’s only a 30-45 min ride from Tokyo Dome City.

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Inside the station.

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There is also a small bank of coin lockers inside the station for around $4 each.

Area Layout

Central Komagome. The station is lower center left. The hill down to the backstreet area is the red-grey-lined street to the upper right of that. The alleyway area is right center. Rt. 455 runs north-south through the town. The APA Hotel is at the upper left corner to the northwest. Rikugien Gardens is just to the lower left out of view. Up is north.

Features

The main feature of Komagome is its mainstreet – Rt. 455 – which runs north-south through the town. At the south end of the town is Rikugien Gardens (see below). There is also a back alley area down the hill behind the station (also see below).

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Rt. 455 – the central road through Komagome facing south. The station is just down on the left. The APA Hotel is just to the right, out of frame.

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The central street through Komagome: Rt. 455.

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The center of town facing south on Rt. 455. There’s a large conbini (convenience store) across from the station on the right.

Cafés

Good cafés abound in Komagome. Be sure to check out the Niki Bakery + Cafe a few blocks south on Rt. 455 on the left.

There are numerous others in the area.

Rikugien Gardens

Facing west south of the station on Rt. 455 leads to the crosswalk shown below. Just to the left on the corner across the street is the entrance to Rikugien Gardens – a must see. Admission is 300¥-400¥ but well worth it. The gardens are huge and you can spend all day there looking at the lake and all the plants and trees. Also note the “31” (Baskin Robbins) just to the right. For some reason the Japanese call Baskin Robbins “31” – all because the 31 is more prominent on signage – and most likely because more Japanese know the western decimal numeral system than know full English.

Crossing to Rikugien Gardens on the left (out of view). As a footnote, if you head west down the side street shown here, after a few blocks you come to Komagome’s sister city, Sugamo. See our full post on Sugamo for more info.

Kyū-Furukawa Gardens + Otani Museum

If you’re willing to walk about a mile further north on Rt. 455 and back, around 35°44’34.58″ N 139°44’45.66″ E there are also the Kyū-Furukawa Gardens and an old museum called Otani Museum – both are worth a look for a little bit more of a hike. A mile further north beyond that on 455 is Oji Station, which is also on the Metro Namboku Line. Also in Oji is Ōji Jinja Shrine.

Komagome Ginza – The Hidden Nightlife Alley

Just down a hill to the left of the station entrance is a hidden backstreet area called Komagome Ginza which comes alive at night with restuarants, shops, bars, and pachinko parlors. To get there, head down the street shown below just left of the station. At the bottom take the first right on a tiny side street. The alley area is just on the left. You can also get to it by traversing down to the bottom level of the station from inside and exit on the left (north entrance). The alleys are well-lit at night with white LED lights and make for a fascinating evening stroll. There are plenty of good restuarants. There is also a huge free bike parking lot just at the lower exit to the station.

Head down this hill and turn right at the bottom for the hidden alley area.

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Heading down the hill. At the bottom, turn right for a tiny side street leading to:

Komagome Ginza – the nightlife area entrance and front of the Three Seven pachninko parlor.

A stroll through the nightlife area next to the Three Seven pachninko parlor.

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One of many great restaurants on the backstreet alley area.

Hotels

There are several good low-cost hotels in the area. The obvious choice is the APA Komagome a few blocks north of the station. During off-season you can get a nice room for around $60-$70/night. APA hotels are spotless, affordable, conveniently located, quiet (they have soundproof windows), and easy. They usually make your trip much easier. APA has a chain of these hotels all over Japan.

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APA Komagome lobby.

Typical APA hotel room – very small, but clean, usually with a small desk, and large TV. Most also have a micro-refrigerator as well.

There is also the nice Hotel Mets Komagome right next to the station. There is also Business Hotel Plaza Komagome, down by Komagome Ginza but it’s not quite as deluxe.

Hon-Komagome Station

About 1.5 miles south on 455 from Komagome Station is another station on the Namboku Line called Hon-Komagome Station (N13) around 35°43’29.15″ N 139°45’14.06″ E. You can also walk the entire distance on 455 south. Sandwiched in between this walk and Sugamo to the west is the world HQ of Pioneer Corporation around 35°43’44.71″ N 139°44’50.29″ E (just south of Rikugien Gardens in fact).

Also just to the west of the station a few blocks is Toyo University (incredibly, in a rare Tokyo oddity, there is a gigantic COCO’s restaurant right across the street from the university at 35°43’25.99″ N 139°45’07.10″ E).

Josenji Temple

Just north of Hon-Komagome Station is Josenji Temple around 35°43’32.86″ N 139°45’11.26″ E – it’s fairly small without a large grounds but might be worth a look if you’re walking.

Conclusion

Well that’s it for now – enjoy a walk or ride around Komagome. It’s a nice little day trip and worth a look.

Additional Photos

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Another view of the front of the station.

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©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

The large bike lot at the bottom of the station.

The lower rear entrance to the station down the hill.

North up Rt. 455 is this large wooden temple with interesting architecture. Worth a stop.

LINKS

Komagome Station/N14

Komagome Station

https://www.jreast.co.jp/e/stations/e712.html

Komagome Station – GaijinPot

Komagome: A Quaint Town in Tokyo

Komagome Area Guide | Tokyo Cheapo

10 BEST Things to Do Near Komagome Station – Tripadvisor

Komagome 2021: Best of Komagome – Tripadvisor

Komagome Area Guide – Blog

APA Hotel Komagome Ekimae

https://www.hotelmets.jp/komagome/

Business Hotel Plaza Komagome | Tokyo Tourist Information

It’s a small world after all in Komagome | The Japan Times

Tokyo Travel: Rikugien Garden

https://www.tokyo-park.or.jp/park/format/index034.html

Sugamo

Tokyo Dome City on Bike

https://www.tokyometro.jp/lang_en/station/oji/index.html

VIDS

Sugamo

Name: Sugamo

Kind: Town/City

Location: 35°44’31.93″ N 139°43’43.02″ E

Stations: Toei Sugamo Station, JR Sugamo Station Yamanote Line

Free Wifi: Yes

Our Rating: ⭑⭑⭑

Worth it? For a quick look, or on the way to Itabashi.

Updated 2/16/2021

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

Sugamo is a small area in Tokyo north of Tokyo Dome City and south of Itabashi on Rt. 17 (Hakusan Dori). It’s not a large area but still worth a look. The main attraction is Rikugien Gardens 2 blocks to the east (discussed below).

Access

Unfortunately there is no Metro subway stop at Sugamo Station. You’ll have to either take the JR Yamanote Line or the Toei Mita Line. The closest main area to Sugamo is Ikebukuro to the west, or Tokyo Dome City (TDC) to the south, but on foot it’s a bit of a hike. On bicycle it’s a quick ride, and there are bike lanes part of the way, but you’ll need to make a short right-turn jog on Hakusan Dori (see below) on bike or you’ll get lost and end up on Old Hakusan Dori to the east which runs away from TDC. The other nearby area is Itabashi to the north several miles from Sugamo Station. Itabashi and Ikebukuro are only 2 miles apart and walkable. You can also get to both on the Yamanote Line or Saikyo Line. If you’re on bike, the entire length of Rt. 17 is cruisable in non-rush hours. See our post on bike cruising from Itabashi all the way through Sugamo to TDC. You can also get to/from Itabashi on the Mita Line at stop I17 – Shin-Itabashi. There is also a Nishi-sugamo Station (I16) further north nearer to Itabashi than to Sugamo. At Nishi-sugamo Station you can also catch the Toden Arakawa Line Tram – better known to locals as the Sakura Tram.

Area Layout

Central Sugamo facing northeast. The station + atré complex is the white square bldg. right of center. Rt. 17 or Hakusan Dori runs north-south. A Beck’s Coffee is the tiny black bldg. next to the small concrete park in the lower right. The main outdoor covered shopping area is just off 17 in the upper center left. Just north of that on the east side of the street is the APA Hotel Sugamo Ekimae (Ekimae means “at the station”). Continuing to head north on 17 for a few miles leads to the small charming micro-town of Itabashi, which just renovated its train station in 2020. There are various other shops + food palaces around the station as shown above.

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JR Sugamo Station facing south towards TDC. APA Sugamo Ekimae is just behind the camera to the left.

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APA Sugamo Ekimae facing south. The station is just ahead 2 blocks.

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Facing south on Hakusan Dori just south of the station. TDC is straight ahead.

Features

Sugamo is not a huge area. But there’s still a fair amount to do. The atré complex over the station is worth a look, and Sugamo Jizo-Dori Shopping Street (discussed next) is a must-see. You can also stroll the outdoor shops along the streets on both sides for miles. Rikugien Gardens (discusssed below) a few miles to the east is a must-see. It’s one of the most well-known Japanese gardens in the world and in the spring + fall is spectacular. The town that Rikugien Gardens is in – Komagome – just to the northeast is also worth a quick look and isn’t too far.

Sugamo Jizo-Dori Shopping Street

Entrance to Sugamo Jizo-Dori Shopping Street which veers off to the left west of Hakusan Dori. The street is lined with charming shops, and if you follow it far enough north you’ll come to Itabashi. The entrance is just north of the APA Hotel on the left around 35°44’04.41″ N 139°44’12.70″ E.

Sugamo Jizo-Dori Shopping Street is a long narrow north-south street which parallels Hakusan Dori in Sugamo. The street is known as a hang-out spot for seniors, but it’s definitely worth a stop for everyone. The street has some very nice food shops with traditional Japanese foods of all kinds. If you keep going north until the end of Sugamo, you’ll come to the charming micro-town of Itabashi, which recently just built a brand new train station. Itabashi is just north of Ikebukuro and is a jumping off point for many other locations on the JR Saikyo Line such as Ikebukuro.

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Sugamo Jizo-Dori Shopping Street with its charming shops facing north. Well worth a stroll.

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©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

Sugamo Jizo-Dori Shopping Street approaching Itabashi.

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Rikugien Gardens


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Approaching Rikugien Gardens, on the right. Just ahead is the small town of Komagome, just east of Sugamo.

If you head south on Hakusan Dori from the station for a few blocks, there’s a side street around 35°43’52.63″ N 139°44’29.39″ E heading east just after the MOS Burger on the left. At the end of this street about a mile down is world-famous Rikugien Gardens – one of the most beautiful Japanese gardens in the country. It’s a must see. Admission is 300-400¥ or so, but it’s worth it for a couple bucks. While you’re there you can stop and check out the town – Komagome – which has its own JR station. It’s a small unremarkable town, but worth a quick walk. There’s also a very large ancient temple there with spectacular architecture. It also has its own APA HotelAPA Komagome. See our post on Komagome for more about the town. It’s worth a quick look.

Hotels

The obvious choice in the area, as we mentioned, is APA Sugamo Ekimae 2 blocks north of the station. Clean, upscale, and relatively cheap at $70-$80/night in off-season, it’s the best bet in Sugamo. There are others around in the area too. Check agoda.com for more choices.

North to Itabashi

Only about a mile north of Sugamo is the small charming town of Itabashi. Several rail lines including JR and the Toei Subway stop there. The JR station is on the Saikyo Line. It’s only about a mile walk north on Hakusan Dori and is worth it if you have extra time. See our full multipart post on Itabashi for more info.

Additional Photos

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The station at night facing north.

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Arriving at TDC on Hakusan Dori from the north.

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Hakusan Dori and the area around TDC actually have some nice bike lanes – if there are no delivery vehicles parked in them.

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Cruising south on Hakusan Dori facing southwest at sunset.

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Beck’s Coffee near the station. The Japanese word for coffee is coheé.

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The covered shopping street just north of the station facing north. APA Sugamo Ekimae is just ahead. You can also hang a right here to explore some of the backstreets where a good 200¥ coin-locker is located.

Courtesy @Mohejin_Japan

The covered shopping street on the west side of Hakusan Dori. Note the Toei Subway entrance on the left.

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This MOS Burger is just down Hakusan Dori on the east side. If you turn left just after this shop when heading south on Hakusan Dori, you’ll come to world-famous Rikugien Gardens on the right – and Komagome.

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The street to the east just south of the MOS Burger leads to Rikugien Gardens.

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A beautiful fall sunset in Sugamo facing west.

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The right split at Old Hakusan Dori heading south from Itabashi. Don’t miss this jump to the right side of the street or you’ll end up way off course and miss TDC.

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Waiting @ the MOS Burger on the way to Komagome. Turn left @ the next intersection for Rikugien Gardens.

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MOS Burger menu. You can actually eat fairly cheap in Japan – under 500¥ (around $5) for a good MOS Burger meal. The company prides itself on fresh ingredients. Our experiences at the chain are generally good.

They even have some fun desserts.

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There is also this small guitar school just north of the gardens.

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Heading north out of Sugamo on Hakusan Dori to Itabashi in late fall.

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The huge temple north of Komagome – eerily silent near midnight.

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The Sakura Tram near Itabashi.

LINKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugamo_Station

https://tokyo-tokyo.com/Sugamo.htm

Sugamo Station – GaijinPot Study

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nishi-sugamo_Station

Tokyo Dome City – Part 1: Itabashi->Tokyo Dome: on Bike

Sugamo | The Official Tokyo Travel Guide, GO TOKYO

Tokyo Travel: Sugamo

Sugamo Area Guide | Tokyo Cheapo

Things to Do near Sugamo Station

APA Hotel Sugamo Ekimae

Sugamo metro station – Metro Line Map

https://www.tokyo-park.or.jp/teien/en/rikugien/access.html

Itabashi | The Official Tokyo Travel Guide, GO TOKYO

VIDS

This vid also shows the APA Hotel towards the end.

Kanda Superguide

Name: Kanda

Kind: Town/City

Location: 35°41’40.88″ N 139°45’53.80″ E

Stations: Kanda Tokyo Metro Station, JR Kanda Station, Ogawamachi Station Toei Shinjuku Line

Free Wifi: Yes

Our Rating: ⭑⭑⭑

Worth it? For a quick look, or enroute to Akihabara

Updated 2/2/2021

©2019-2021 tenmintokyo.com

Sandwiched in between Akihabara to the northeast and Tokyo Station to the south is a part of Tokyo called Kanda. It’s centered on Rt. 405 (Sotobori Dori) just north of the financial district Marunouchi. Also just to the northwest is Ochinomizu. Akihabara is just a few minutes’ walk up Rt. 302 to the east. Jimbocho, Tokyo’s used book town is just 1/4 mile to the west. All 4 areas are within walking distance of each other.

Access

To get to Kanda take the Tokyo Metro Ginza Line to Kanda Station or the JR Yamanote Line and exit Kanda Station. It’s also quite easy to walk from either Tokyo Station to the south or Akihabara Station to the north. Note however that the main JR Kanda Station is actually about 4 blocks to the southeast. There is also plenty to do around the station itself. If you walk south on Rt. 17 from JR Kanda Station it will take you directly into Nihonbashi which is one of the nicest areas of Tokyo, although it is in the opposite direction from central Kanda.

A quicker + closer way is to go to Ogawamachi Station on the Toei Shinjuku Line, around 35°41’42.88″ N 139°45’59.85″ E and head west one block, or take the Metro to Awajicho Station on the Marunouchi Line.

Heading south from JR Kanda Station.

JR Kanda Station facing north on Chuo Dori. Continuing north will take you right into Akihabara, which is the next JR stop north on the Yamanote Line. The area under the station to the north side is known as Kanda Crossing. There’s a small side street shown here on the right worth a stroll.

Area Layout

Central Kanda. Akihabara is on the right side of the frame, Jimbocho on the left. The WATERRAS complex is the large black building to the upper right. Sotobori Dori is the main street running north-south center right.

Central Intersection

The central area in Kanda is on the intersection of Yasukuni-Dori (Rt. 302) and Hongo-Dori (Rt. 403). You can walk west or east on 302 for miles and there is a lot to see. On the very west end is Jimbocho, known as Tokyo’s used book town (as well as an area with lots of sports shops).

At the intersection there are lots of cafés and restaurants including a Doutor and an Excelsior Café. In fact, there are 2 Doutours 1 block apart. There are also a variety of noodle and yakiniku (steak) places around. And several conbini (convenience stores).

Facing west on 302 towards Jimbocho.

Facing east on 302 towards Akihabara. Excelsior Café is on the right. The block from here east is the central area. WATERRAS (see below) is one block up to the left. You can also just barely see Tokyo Sky Tree in Suitengumae in the distance.

The Doutour one block to the west.

Kanda Nishiguchi Shopping Street

Several blocks to the southeast around 35°41’28.24″ N 139°46’07.97″ E is the entrance to a narrow little street full of shops called Kanda Nishiguchi Shopping Street. It’s just a few blocks, but worth a stroll if you’re willing to walk the 8 blocks or so down Rt. 403 to get to it.

WATERRAS + Sola City

Just to the north a few blocks up Rt. 305 is an office/shopping complex called WATERRAS. WATERRAS has some cafés at the ground level, a Mr. Donut on the northeast corner, and a large upscale shopping complex called Sola City across the street to the north. It’s worth a quick walk around. The main area of interest is up the front WATERRAS escalator and stairs, then around to the left. There is also a large garden terrace on the southwest corner of the building.

WATERRAS 2 blocks to the north.

Sports Shops

Further west on 302 the street is lined with sports shops on both sides – mostly ski + snowboard shops. There is also a Xebio and Victoria sport shop near each other a few blocks down to the west.

glitch Coffee Jimbocho

Just at the west edge of Kanda and into Jimbocho around 35°41’37.53″ N 139°45’40.15″ E is the hipster café glitch Coffee. It’s in an old run down dump of a building and has no sign other than on the front window, but the inside is very nice and the coffee + food is awesome. If you want to venture just a bit west of Kanda into Jimbocho, it’s worth a stop.

Top Tokyo Coffeehouses: Glitch Coffee, Fuglen And More

Believe it or not, in this dilapidated building is the hipster café glitch Coffee. The shop also has a small walk-up window on the left.

Facing north in Jimbocho. glitch Coffee is in the small pink bldg. on the right. Kanda is just up the street to the right east of Jimbocho.

The HUB @ Kanda Station

For a foreigner-friendly stop with food + drinks check out The HUB just south of JR Kanda Station.

The HUB @ Kanda Station. Also note there are 3 cafés right next door.

TAP x TAP Kanda Craft Beer

If you’re in the mood for craft beer, there’s TAP X TAP Kanda around 35°41’34.09″ N 139°46’20.90″ E. To get there, exit JR Kanda Station, head to the northeast side street known as Kanda Crossing shown above, go through the side street entrance on the right, then turn right again at the 1st block. It’s just down on the left side 2 blocks.

Kanda Myojin Shrine

A bit of a hike north on Rt. 452 around 35°42’06.62″ N 139°46’03.28″ E is Kanda Shrine. It’s a large complex with spectacular architecture but it’s closer to Akihabara than it is to Kanda. If you’re up for a bit of a walk and have time, it’s worth checking out. There are a few other shrines in the area.

Kanda River + Rt 405

The Kanda River, which cuts through the center of Tokyo east-west runs approximately from the Sumida River to the east all the way to Tokyo Dome City to the west. In fact, you can walk the entire distance on Rt. 405 which parallels it. Just head north on any one of the major north-south streets in Kanda or Jimbocho to get to 405. You can also head east (right) on 405 to get to Akihabara. The distance from central Jimbocho to Tokyo Dome City is only about 1 mile.

Hotels

There are a variety of hotels in Kanda, but perhaps the best value once again is APA Hotel. In fact there are 3 APA Hotels in the area, but one of them, APA Hotel Kanda-Eki-Higashi is far to the southeast. Just south of Akihabara Station is APA Hotel Kanda Ekimae around 35°41’36.66″ N 139°46’17.15″ E (Ekimae means “at the station”). The closest one is APA Hotel Kanda Jimbocho Eki-Higashi just to the west. There are also 2 APAs in Akihabara. APA has some of the best deals in hotels in Japan – with hundreds of them all over the country and many all over Tokyo. Off-season rates are usually very good and depending on occupancy can run from $65-$90/night. At some APA’s off-season you can even get rates as low as $40 depending on how centrally located the hotel is. All are clean, and slightly upscale depending on location.

There is also HOTEL MYSTAYS Ochanomizu CC just to the north.

Jazz Clubs

There are a surprising number of good jazz clubs near Kanda. Just south of Awajicho Station is JAZZ LIVE Lydian. Just north in Ochinomizu is Naru. Jazz spot Step is just a little northwest of JR Kanda Station. There’s also a Tokyo Jazz Festival site and YouTube Channel.

Conclusion

Well that’s it. Kanda/Jimbocho is a great place to visit. It’s 1/2 way between Tokyo Station and Akihabara so you can access both those areas too. In fact, assuming you want to spend all day in the area, you can see all 3 in a long day, although Akihabara is really a full day in itself. The walk along Rt. 403 from Jimbocho to Akihabara with Kanda in the middle is only about 1.5 miles, so it’s easy. There is plenty to do and see along the way. Enjoy!

Additional Photos

Heading into central Jimbocho.

LINKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanda,_Tokyo

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanda_Station_(Tokyo)

Kanda Area Guide | Tokyo Cheapo

WATERRAS

https://japantravel.navitime.com/en/area/jp/spot/06123-5375/

Make stained glass works with the gift ‘Marine Glass‘ from the sea!

Tokyo Metro Kanda Station – Japan Travel

Kanda Station Tokyo | JapanVisitor Japan Travel Guide

Kanda Station Area Management Association

Tokyo Travel: Kanda

Kanda Area Guide | Tokyo Cheapo

Craft Beer in Kanda | Metropolis Japan

https://www.agoda.com/apa-hotel-kanda-eki-higashi/hotel/tokyo-jp.html?cid=1720055

Glitch Coffee, Kanda-Jimbocho

GLITCH COFFEE & ROASTERS グリッチコーヒー&ロースターズ

Walking The Path To Glitch Coffee In Jimbocho, Tokyo

VIDS